Bulbous tip, deviated septum and adenoid problem. Is this made worse with my somewhat projected ears?

I have some difficulty breathing that has been identified as a problem with my swollen adenoids. This has caused discomfort and post-nasal drip year-round. I also think my nose is not very proportionate with my whole face but am not exactly sure what should be corrected. Is this made worse with my somewhat projected ears?

Doctor Answers 8

Protruding ears and nose proportion

Without photos it is hard to say, but the ears are not traditionally looked at as part of the proportion analysis of the nose. Ears are analyzed mostly with respect to their own contour. Ears should lie at the level of the eyebrow, be at a 20 degree angle off vertical, and be less than 1 inch protruding from the skull. Otoplasty is an option as a stand alone procedure, essentially independent of the nasal aesthetics. 


Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Nasal deformity and projected ears

Overly projected ears do not affect the nose in any way.  If the nose has a significant deformity, it will be obvious on its own but not because of the ears.

In terms of what should be done for Correction, it depends on what bothers you more, the bulbous tip or the protruding ears.

Regards

Dr. J

Tanveer Janjua, MD
Bedminster Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 98 reviews

For a true evaluation of your nose and ears I suggest a personal exam

Rhinoplasty can be performed at the same time as otoplasty. We often do that for teenagers. To get a bertter idea of what is best for you in terms of surgidal procedures and timing, you should see a facial plastic surgeon to discuss your ears and nose.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 109 reviews

Rhinoplasty for the bulbous tip and an otoplasty

 A rhinoplasty procedure can accomplish narrowing the bulbous tip with suture techniques and conservative cartilage removal applied to lower lateral cartilages of the  tip. There are many reasons that can cause breathing difficulties inside the nose such as a deviated nasal septum, turbinate hypertrophy and swollen adenoids. Adenoids tend to disappear at puberty and it is unusual to have  them significantly enlarged when patients require a rhinoplasty. An otoplasty procedure can accomplish pinning the ears backward to make them look less obvious. For many examples, please see the link and the video below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Airway and aesthetic problem

If enlarged adenoids have been diagnosed as causing airway problems, then first seen an ENT to take care of that. After that, if you want a rhinoplasty and otoplasty ,then an expert in rhinoplasty ,( either a plastic surgeon or ENT facial plastic surgeon), can be consulted.

Dennis Barek, MD
Great Neck Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Your issues

It's hard to tell without a photo. We offer a complimentary consultation, so come in and talk to a plastic surgeon to discuss your problems and what can  be done for them.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Rhinoplasty

Hello and thank you for your question. Based on your description, you may be a good candidate for a rhinoplasty and an otoplasty, which can be performed at the same time. The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

Otoplasty and rhinoplasty

If you are asking can an otoplasty be performed at the same time as a rhinoplasty, then I would say yes. If you are asking if the shape of your ears impacts your breathing issue, then no.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.