I have large, saggy breasts and I want a breast reduction. Can I choose how small I want them?

I'm 5'2", 125 lbs, 26 y/o woman. My breasts have always been too large for my frame. I had a c-cup and weighed 100 for most of high school. I'm now a 34DD. I really find it difficult to wear clothing that's flattering and I find an A or B cup to be suitable.

Doctor Answers 6

Find the right surgeon

Far more important than the technique is the skill and experience of your plastic surgeon. Choose your surgeon rather than the technique and let them explain why one technique may be better than another. 
See the below link on some suggestions on finding the most qualified Plastic Surgeon for a BBL Always insist on a board certified plastic surgeon.

Your breast size after a breast reduction is entirely up to you, but an A or small B cup will not look ideal.

Of course you can choose your breast size. However, an A cup or small B cup is usually not wise because your breasts will look too deflated. I would recommend you consider a full B or small C cup. Also, you should know that there are different types of breast reduction. The inverted-T anchor scar is the traditional method, but produces breasts that are boxy and flattened, with a long horizontal scar. The vertical method is superior. Also, if you want upper pole fullness you should consider small implants (I know that sounds like a contradiction). You can read more about this subject at my website if you like. The link is below. The more informed you are the better.

Eric Swanson, MD
Kansas City Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

I want a breast reduction. Can I choose how small I want them?

I explain to my patients that with excessive breast reduction the breast flattens but does not become narrower and yet maintain its projection. There is a certain point where aesthetics suffer and excessive breast reduction can be a mistake.  Most patients who are double D cup aim for approximately a full C cup size with the understanding that this is an estimate especially since bra manufacturers are so variable in their sizing.  If my patient was requesting a B cup I would be afraid that she might regret the decision in the future.  Most patients however who do go from a DD cup to a C/D cup are delighted with the alleviation of symptoms and the better proportioning they see in their upper body.  Good luck in your decision,

Jon A Perlman M.D., FACS
Diplomate, American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member, American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS)
Beverly Hills, California

Jon A. Perlman, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Breast Reduction

It is a misconception that we can do a breast reduction to a specific bra size, but show the surgeon photos of a look that you prefer and he will certainly do his best to get close as long as it is a result that would be reasonable based on your starting anatomy. During breast reduction surgery certain areas and amounts of tissue have to be retained on the chest wall for safe healing.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

I have large, saggy breasts and I want a breast reduction. Can I choose how small I want them?

If you are paying out of pocket for a breast reduction, then you can choose how small you want them the to be. If you are trying to go through insurance, they usually require a specific minimum amount of tissue to be removed. Sizing is something that you would need to discuss with your surgeon. 

Lawrence Bundrick, MD
Huntsville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

I have large, saggy breasts and I want a breast reduction. Can I choose how small I want them?

Thank you for your question. Based on your description, you may be an excellent candidate for breast reduction surgery; this operation is one of the most patient pleasing operations we perform.


  By removing “excess” breast tissue, adipose tissue, and breast skin this operation reduces AND lifts the breasts to a higher position on the chest wall (in other words, the breasts are "automatically" lifted when a breast reduction is performed). By doing so, patients often find improvement in neck, back, and shoulder discomfort and find it easier to form their activities of daily living and exercise.



The most important decision you make: careful selection of your plastic surgeon. I would suggest starting with the American Society of Plastic Surgery and/or the Aesthetic Society of Plastic Surgery to obtain a list of well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons.

Then, I would suggest you visit a few surgeons whose practices concentrate on aesthetic surgery. Ask to SEE lots of examples of their work AND preferably speak/see patients who have had similar procedures done.

Be very careful with your decision-making. You will find, while doing your due diligence, that there are many different “specialties” who will offer their services to you; again, I strongly recommend you concentrate on surgeons certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.



 Careful preoperative communication is also one of the keys to success with any type of breast surgery.   With the goal of improving communication with my patients I find the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) very helpful.  The use of computer imaging is also becoming more helpful when it comes to the communication process.



 For example, I have found that the use of words such as “ proportionate” or “A or B cup” means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful. Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup size may also be inaccurate.  the use of computer imaging is becoming more helpful when it comes to the communication process.


Best wishes for outcome that you will be very pleased with, regardless of the (somewhat arbitrary) cup size achieved.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.