Facelift and eye bag removal surgery at 60. Is it safe?

Hello Doctors, My mother is in her early 60's and she is about to get a facelift and eye bag removal surgery done. Now she wants to know if it's acceptable for her to get it done in her age. Overall she's a healthy person, she's active but she has some issues with high blood pressure (which she takes medication). Thank you for your help I am a little concerned and worried

Doctor Answers 34

Facelift at 60

This sounds like a perfect age, but make sure that she has been cleared for the surgery by her internist.

Facelift Surgery At Age 60

It is common to perform a facelift in patients in this age group as long as one is healthy. You will have excellent results if done in the hands of a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon with expertise in facial rejuvenation and one who understands the science of aging.

Rod J. Rohrich, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Safety of surgery

Thank you for your question.  Assuming her blood pressure is well controlled and she is cleared for surgery by her primary care physician, she should be fine.  Many of our patients undergoing facial rejuvenation are in this age group or older.  Make sure the surgeon is board certified as well.  All the best, 

Keshav Magge, MD
Bethesda Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews


Age 60 might be the most common age to have this surgery. It is safe if your mother is a good surgical risk – that is no significant medical problems;
the surgeon is well qualified, and the facility has appropriate anesthesia personnel, proper monitoring and recovery capabilities. This surgery, if done properly, involves minimal blood loss and disruption to one’s overall metabolism.

She Sounds Like a Good Facelift Candidate

Thank you for reaching out to this forum on your mother's behalf. Based on what you've written, it appears your mother would be an ideal candidate for a facelift. Many of the patients who come to my Long Island practice for facial rejuvenation, such as a facelift or eyelid surgery, are in their early 60s. In fact, some are several years older. What really matters is the patient's health, rather than her chronological age. Your mother's plastic surgeon will ask about her medical history and any current medications she is taking during her consultation.

James N. Romanelli, MD, FACS
Long Island Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Facelift and eye bag removal surgery at 60. Is it safe?

Hi, I have performed many facelifts over the past 30 years and quite a few on healthy patients in their 80's.  Patient safety and well-being is my top priority when considering a prospective patient for a facelift or any surgery.  With the advent of minimally invasive, minimal dissection facelifts this has allowed an otherwise 5 plus hour procedure to be performed in only 90 minutes.  I have included information about my minimally invasive facelift below.  

Following the beauty principles outlined in my book on face and body beauty, women look the most feminine, youthful and attractive with heart shaped faces. Heart shaped faces have cheeks that are full and round in the front.  Cheek augmentation using a dermal filler (I prefer Restylane Lyft) or with cheek implants for a permanent enhancement will create full, round cheeks anteriorly that will feminize the entire face.

Jowls are sagging facial tissues and an indication for some form of a facelift.  The underlying SMAS layer, of the face, must be dissected, lifted, trimmed and re-sutured.  The excess skin is then removed and the facelift incisions closed.

My most popular facelift is the minimally invasive, short incision facelift that has all the benefits of more invasive facelifts (traditional, mid-face, deep plane and subperiosteal facelifts) but with these added benefits:

•very small incisions
•minimal tissue dissection = less bruising and swelling = rapid recovery
•can be performed in 90 minutes or less, with or without anesthesia
•no incisions within the hair = no hair loss
•excess fat can be removed
•excess skin removed
•cheeks, chin and jaw line can be augmented with dermal fillers (I prefer Restylane Lyft) or facial implants
•most patients fly back home to parts all over the world in as little as 3 days post-op

Hope this helps.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 24 reviews



Thank you for your question. 

It is common for patients in their 60s to undergo facelifts, should they be suitable candidates. 

During her consultation with her Board Certified Plastic Surgeon she should inform them of her health history. At this time, they will determine if she's a good candidate and what her options would be. 

Take care. 

Facelift and eye bag removal surgery at 60. Is it safe?

It is not unusual at all for a person in her 60's to have a facelift and eyelid lift. Age is not a contraindication at all. Her blood pressure does need to be under control, and she should get a medical clearance from her primary care physician.

Warren J. Katz, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Is it safe to do this at age 60?

In short, age alone is not a contraindication to surgery. The overall health of the person is more important. Mild disease that is well-controlled is the norm and the vast majority of these patients have safe operations unaffected by their conditions. This should be a normal part of your preoperative work-up. I hope this helps.

Age is Just a Number

60 is the perfect age to address these sorts of concerns. Her plastic surgeon will likely ask her to get a pre-surgery clearance by her primary care doctor, during which I’m sure they will discuss her entire medical history, including current medications. However, keep in mind, age is just a number – your health is an entirely different measure.

Mark Karolak, DO, FAOCO
Bridgewater Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.