Is this a polly beak deformation? (photos)

11 months ago I got a nosejob, performed by a highly experienced doctor. After a couple of weeks my nosetip seemed more swollen than the rest of the nose. 3 months later this was still the case but the doctor told me it should heal. Now, 11 months later, the nose tip is still swollen. Is this a Polly beak deformation? And if so, what's the chance of this happening again in case of revision surgery?

Doctor Answers 3

Is This a Pollybeak?

Although I would not technically call this a pollybeak you do have slight fullness of your profile immediately above the tip. I suggest you consider a minor revision slightly lowering the profile above your tip and augmenting the depression located higher on the bridge.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Nasal Deformity after Rhinoplasty

Your profile photo seems to demonstrate a nasal deformity at the nasal bone/ cartilage junction of your bridge. This could have occurred as the result of slightly removing too much of the dorsal nasal bone or conversely, leaving too much of the cartilaginous nasal bridge. 

You do not appear to have a classic polly beak deformity. I would speak to your surgeon about your concerns and seek an opinion about a minor revision. Hopefully you will be able to have your bridge refined further and correct this problem. 

Fred J. Bressler, MD, FACS
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

A polybeak deformity is when the low bridge is too high and causes a bump above the nasal tip following rhinoplasty surgery.

The bump on your profile is a bit high to be considered a "polybeak", but the issue is similar, and your concern may require revision surgery to lower your profile bump. Depending on your examination, adding volume above the bump may lead to a less distracting nasal appearance.

Hope this helps.

Dr Joseph

Eric M. Joseph, MD
West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 386 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.