When can I use arms for stabilizing exercises post Breast Augmentation?

My BA was performed almost 5 weeks ago and I'd like to get back to working out. There were no complications with the surgery and I'm doing massages twice a day. Specifically, when would I be able to use my arms to stabilize myself? For example, getting on all 4s, lifting an arm and a leg simultaneously and low/high planks. I wouldn't weight lift for a while yet, but am wondering how soon I can incorporate using arms to support body weight. Thank you!

Doctor Answers 7

Arm movements post BA

These sort of vigorous arm movements should not really start until at least 6 weeks and some patients do not feel ready despite starting then and have to defer until 8-10 weeks

Exercise post breast augmentation

Thank you for your question and congratulations on your breast augmentation. It's best to speak with your surgeon before doing any type of exercise post surgery.

Excercising arms after BA

Best to ask your operating surgeon for their specific regimen. We allow our patients to engage their chest muscles progressively usually at 3 weeks postop but do so in a progressively aggressive manner; ie, start w low reps and low weights.

Activity after breast aigmentation

congrats on your recent surgery! Echoing what others are saying on this forum, it would be most appropriate to follow your chosen surgeon's guidelines as he or she knows details of you and your surgery best. Good luck! 

Best to follow your surgeon's advice

It is always best for you to follow your surgeon's advice as stated below, she/he is the only one who knows what type of procedure was performed.

For my patients (I generally perform under the muscle), I recommend resuming most normal activity in 4-6 weeks.  I strongly urge minimizing isolating chest for the first year.

Stabilization should be fine as long as there are minimal implant movement.

Best Wishes,

Nana Mizuguchi, MD

Nana N. Mizuguchi, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Working Out After Breast Augmentation

Thank you for your question.

It's probably best if your surgeon answers this question for you.  They know you, and your surgery best, and can provide the best recommendations for you based on your postoperative course.  Congratulations on your breast augmentation!


Dr. Dan Krochmal

MAE Plastic Surgery

Northbrook, IL

Daniel Krochmal, MD
Chicago General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Hold off for 1 more week on the stabilizing exercises

Thank you for your question.

This question may be best be answered by your surgeon as we all have different post-operative instructions for proper recovery.

That being said, I would not risk anything and wait for an extra week (i.e., 6 weeks post-op) in order to get back to stabilizing exercises.

Why I say this is because even though you are not lifting heavy weights, stabilizing exercises may require you to use your arms to uphold your body weight in certain positions. Balancing your body weight on one arm may be more intense than lifting the heavy dumbbells that we ask you to refrain from lifting.

As such, let’s have you wait one more week just to be safe.

Remember, you should work to slowly increase your activity level. This will be dependent on your own perception of how well you feel. Any minute you feel an activity is causing pressure or causing you to feel stretch in your breasts, then stop the activity. Point to note is that you want to avoid using your chest muscles.

If your implants are placed behind the pectoralis major muscle, then you will also have to avoid any exertion or strenuous activity that requires use of the upper body (e.g., chest, arms) for at least 6 weeks. This includes but is not limited to running, push-ups, pull-ups, and weight-lifting. Even when you return to high impact upper-body exercises, many surgeon may advise on the importance of supporting your breasts with snug fitting sports bra.

Hope this helps.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 416 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.