Neck Skin Doesn't Look Even Lifted - 10 Months After Face & Neck Lift. Is This a Common Result? (photo)

Ten months after a face & neck lift (no lipo was done), the skin directly under my chin does not look or feel evenly lifted. One side is taunt and tucks up nicely under my chin, the other side is loose and pliable. Is this asymmetry a common result (that I should just accept), or was the lift not done correctly (and needs a revision)? Thank you.

Doctor Answers 23

Loose Asymmetric Skin After A Facelift

After all facelifts, there is some relaxation of tissues.  In most patients, this relaxation is relatively inconspicuous and patient's can enjoy a long lasting facelift result.  There are some patients who have early laxity in the neck after a facelift.  This results in the need for a procedure known as a "tuck up", which can be a relatively minor procedure, sometimes performed in office.  Surgeons who are well versed and experienced in facelifts aim for as low a "tuck up" rate as possible.  However, the "tuck up" rate is never 0 for a surgeon (or else he/she has not performed enough facelifts or followed up on patients long enough) as there are too many factors outside of technical ones which can affect the result including your own inherent elasticity of your skin which can impact final result.   Discuss with your surgeon regarding your result.

Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 142 reviews

My neck appears asymmetric, even after my facelift!

Beginning in the womb, our faces develop from 2 "sides" of tissue. It is normal for our faces to become asymmetric. As long as this is not too extreme, we don't notice it much. And when you add such factors as movement that may be more on one side than the other, the positions we favor during sleep, sun exposure on our driving side (left side in the USA) and right versus left dominance,  these differences can even intensify over time.  While surgery (such as facelift) is designed to help improve position, sagging, and aging changes, these asymmetries will still manifest themselves. Best advice? discuss with a well trained board certified surgeon before undergoing procedures. This will help all of us understand these factors, set realistic expectations and create happier patients!  

For more and fascinating info on how our faces develop, check out the videos produced by the BBC when you Google "facial development in the womb" 



Donn R. Chatham, MD
Louisville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Neck doesn't look lifted after a face and neck lift

This is not really uncommon and happens all the time. It totally depends on how you do the procedure. There are many short cuts that lead to less than optimal results. But most of the time your surgeon has the very best intention. If you just do a facelift it won't pull the neck up sufficiently. You need to also do a neck lift as well.

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.9 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Assymetry folowing facelift

I tell my patients that no one is symmetrical. But I would go back to your surgeon and see if he can do a little tuck under your chin to get rid of this excess.This should be simple to do,

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Face & Neck Lift

I would advise a revision at this time. This is not the typical result of a face and neck lift. The problem appears to be the platysmal band. You need to schedule an appointment with your surgeon and let him know that you are not satisfied with the results and would like to schedule a revision.

David Alessi, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Asymmetry After Facelift

It is not rare to have some asymmetry in the amount of neck tightening around the chin area, particularly after all swelling has subsided and some rebound skin relaxation has occurred. This is not a technique or a sign or poor work, it is to some degree an inherent issue of how the tissues respond to healing and being tightened. You likely weren't perfectly symmetric before surgery and that can affect the symmetry of the outcome. Whether a small revision on one side is worthwhile is a personal choice. A small jowl tuck-up on the one side will likely improve the asymmetry issue.

Sagging Neck Skin after 10 month surgery

If there is still sagging under your chin after a neck lift (10 months) and the platysmal bands are prominent, in our practice we would possibly  advise a revision to repair the banding (platysmal banding) with a small incision under the chin and bringing the bands together and then redraping the neck skin for a tighter more youthful appearance. 

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS (in memoriam)
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
3.3 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

We don't have the before picture to compare with your current photo.

However I do agree that your surgeon will be motivate to help you with this issue.  You will then have to decide if it is worth having surgery at this point to obtain a degree of improvement.  Before you decide this, it is very helpful to review the pre and post operative photographs with your surgeon.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Neck skin excess after facelift

It does appear that you have a prominent platysmal band on your left.  There are many possible reasons for this depending on what was done at your original surgery.  I would suggest that you discuss this with your surgeon as this could be simply resolved with a revision.

Leonard T. Yu, MD
Maui Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Facelift revision

The frontal neck folds are uneven with the left one more prominent. Frankly, you need a small revision. Most Board Certified Plastic Surgeons are willing to do this, provided they think they can improve the situation.

I would revise the surgery.

J. Brian Boyd, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.