Restylane vs perlane for under eye bags?

I want to get some injectable fillers to improve the look of my puffy eye bags and dark eye circles. Usually, how many syringes do i need for restylane? Compared with perlane, which one is better? My laugh lines are not that deep. Will the injections soft the laugh lines the same time if i get injections for under eye area?

Doctor Answers 11

Under eye bags

Fillers are not effective for under eye bags. If you have bags under the eyes the only correct treatment is an eye job. Fillers can fill in an area that is decreased and indented--the groove

Nashville Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Under the Eye Filler

Restylane is a better option for under the eye treatment.  Perlane is a bit too thick and may result in irregularity that can be seen and/or felt.  Depending on how much I am trying to correct, an entire syringe may be used to help correct the deficiency.

For laugh lines either Restylane or Perlane will go fine.  Perlane will then to do a better correction as it is thicker and may last longer.

Hope that helps.

Farbod Esmailian, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 71 reviews

Lower lid fillers

Under the eyes, Restylane would be the appropriate filler. The skin is thin and Perlane is too thick. The amount of product necessary would depend upon how much is needed. Treating the lower kids would have no effect on laugh lines in another area of the face and might result in your heightened awareness of them. If finances allow, consider treatment of both areas.

Fillers for under the eyes

Thank you for the questions. Restylane is probably one of the better fillers for under eye treatment. Perlane is too thick for that area, but is good for cheeks. For smile lines, any filler can be used, but the choice should be based of the depth of the lines. I hope you find this helpful. Good luck. 

Injectable Filler Options for Under-Eye Bags

Thank you for your inquiry. For dark circles under the eyes, Teosyal Redensity II or Restylane are good options for those not yet ready for blepharoplasty (corrective eye surgery). Perlane is thicker, so the results are not as good for the under-eye area. The amount used varies depending on the person. As for under-eye bags, injectable fillers can reduce their appearance, but the best solution is usually blepharoplasty, which can even remove the bags in some cases. Your laugh lines would be treated as a different area. Consult a qualified plastic surgeon in person for the solution(s) that is best for you. 

Cory Torgerson, MD, PhD, FRCSC
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 105 reviews

Restylane Injections for Eye and Nasolabial Folds

If your bags are deep then you may need a surgical correction for that area.  The nasolabial area can be treated with Restylane or Perlane.  If they are deep than Perlane would be preferred.  Best, Dr. Green

Restylane vs Perlane

Restylane would be the preferred filler for under the eye area.  Restylane is not a treatment for "under eye bags" but rather it is injected into the "tear trough" or valley that forms between the eye bag and the upper mid cheek.  By filling in the valley, the hill (eye bag) is perceived to be smaller.  For some people this works great, others will need a blepharoplasty to remove some of the fat causing the bulge.

Jerome Potozkin, MD
Danville Dermatologic Surgeon
4.2 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Under eye bags

A photo would be helpful to assess your problem . However, injectables fillers usually fill a depression such as running from the nose toward the cheek (nasojugal depression). This will camoflauge a "bag" in the lower eyelid. It will not make the bag go away. That can only be done by lower eyelid blepharoplasty surgery. Restylane would be the preferred filler.

Andrew Pichler, MD
Sacramento Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Eyelid bags and Dark Circles

There are many factors to assess before treating lower eyelid bags.  The "puffiness" may be due to fluid accumulation, fat pad relocation, loose skin or a combination of these.

After the examination and determination of best approach for the patient's features one or more procedures may be recommended.  For repositioned or "herniated" lower eyelid fat pads a surgical approach (blepharoplasty) is usually the most effective option.  if there is a contour variation between the bulging fat pads and the cheek a "tear trough" is often present which can be filled to soften the appearance of the bulge. The less dense hyaluronic acid (HA) "fillers" such as Restylane or Belotero are good choices for this approach.  Perlane is too dense and bulky a filler to be used in this location with potential for lumps and greater risk of complications.

Some patients will benefit significantly from just tightening the skin in the area above the trough by laser or other technology based procedures.

"Dark circles"  can be lessened by treatment of the underlying pigment and fine blood vessels by some of the specialized lasers that we use such as V Beam and Gentlelase.

As with all procedures involving the delicate tissues around the eyes please be sure that your doctor is a specialist and experienced in treatment of this area.

Victor Michalak, MD
Issaquah Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Restylane vs Perlane for under eyes

Thank you for your question.  A photo would help further assess whether fillers in general will help you.  People tend to use the terms 'bags under the eyes' as a catch all phrase to describe their eye concerns.  If there is a shadowing under the eyes that can be softened with the use of a filler, then I would generally prefer Restylane over Perlane (now rebranded as Restylane Lyft).  I would recommend that you visit with a board certified plastic surgeon with experience in both under eye injection and surgery so you can discuss your option in more detail.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.