Botox can't improve fines lines around my eye corners (crow's feet)?

I have couple lines at the corner of my eyes ( crow's feet ). Although they were so fine, i still went to a med spa to get 20 units of botox to improve my look. It's been two weeks since my botox visit, i don't see the expected improvements. Does it mean botox is useless to me?

Doctor Answers 20

Botox for fine lines/ crow's feet

Hi ghost01,

There are too many factors that would determine whether you will be happy with Botox results or not: 
-experience of injector
-dilution of product
-sufficient dose (determined at your initial consultation and based on the degree of muscle activity)
-depth of injections
-static or dynamic lines (static lines do not respond to such injections)

Hope this helps!
TZ


Montreal Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Crow's Feet

Hello, 

Thank you for your question. 

It is difficult to say without viewing your before and after photos. 

I'd recommend booking a follow-up appointment with your skilled and qualified injector to express your concerns and to determine what your options may be.

Take care.  

Botox

Thank you for your question in regards to Botox.

It is best to refer back to before and after photos which are very important, especially to a first time Botox user. You may just need additional units to achieve your desired goal. To be sure what is best for you, see two or more board-certified providers in your area for a complete evaluation to make sure you are a good candidate and that it is safe for you to have treatment.

I hope this helps.

J. Jason Wendel, MD, FACS
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 150 reviews

Find an experienced aesthetic physician

No, Botox can be very effective in reducing crows feet at the corner of the eyes. I recommend you see a board certified esthetic specialist for an evaluation. Finding an experienced physician, such as a cosmetic dermatologist or plastic surgeon is the key to having a good result and positive experience.

Steven Bernstein, MD
Montreal Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox for crows feet

 Thank you for your question. It would be helpful to see your before and after pictures, as well as the plan that was used for your Botox injections. Different injectors will use different techniques, and there are definitely more impactful techniques and others.  

Fine Lines Around Eyes -- Combination Botox, Lasers/RF, Microneedling

fine lines do not improve with botox alone as these are wrinkles at rest and need fillers, lasers, and microneedling for improvement.  Please see an expert to go over a long term treatment plan for you.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 167 reviews

Botox and Crow's Feet around the Eyes

Botox generally helps treat the Crow's feet exceptionally well.  However, you may have too much extra skin around the eyes and the skin may be pulling causing excess wrinkles.  If you could post a photo it might be easier to assess.  Botox needs to be performed by a board certified dermatologist for the best cosmetic results.  Best, Dr. Green

Botox for Crow's Feet

This is a somewhat complex question.  Yes, it is important to find a provider that has good experience and knows where to place the injections.  Typically Botox is a great treatment for crow's feet but there are some limitations.  First, the injection can not be placed closer then approximately 1 cm from the corner of the eye or the eyelid could be droopy.  In this case, the closest wrinkles on the side of one's eyes may not be addressed.  Second,  Botox can not be injected too far around the corner eye or it can worsen or create festoons.  These add to the look of being tired.  Thirdly, Botox can only relax the muscle.  If those wrinkles are there at rest they will be there after Botox and something else will have to be done to improve them.  Typically, a resurfacing procedure (peel or laser).  See, it gets complicated!  Find someone you trust to talk these issues through.  Good luck!

Hannah Vargas, MD
Kansas City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Botox and Crow's Feet

Botox can be extremely effective in treating crow's feet. However, the success of your Botox treatment is highly dependent on the skill of the person doing the injecting. If your crow's feet both you, I would suggest that you consult with a board certified plastic surgeon or cosmetic dermatologist in your area to get a second opinion. Hope this helps and sorry that your results were less than ideal -- Dr. Nazarian

Sheila S. Nazarian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Botox doesn't fix lines immediately: GREAT QUESTION!

Ghost, you pose a great question which can be applied to any neuromodulator: Botox, Dysport, or Xeomin. There could be at least two reasons your Botox for crow's feet didn't fix your fine lines right away. One reason is that Botox, Dysport, and Xeomin DO NOT SMOOTH LINES immediately by pulling the skin out flat. All they can do is relax the underlying delicate muscles of facial expression that create these "dynamic" wrinkles. If the muscles are kept weak over many cycles of Botox, say, 3, 6, 9, or even 12 months, the skin that was used to getting folded all the time starts to eventually smooth out, like a sheet kept flat on the bed. This does take time in some cases, especially with older skin or deeper, etched creases. Second, some crow's feet are not going to be completely unfolded because what really needs to happen is for the brows to be lifted, and Botox is limited in its ability to do that without a surgical brow lift. Each case should be evaluated in person by a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon who is a Botox expert and really understands the abilities and limitations of this popular treatment.

Jessica J. Krant, MD, MPH
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.