I had a lumpectomy for breast cancer. I had 4 lymph nodes removed. I now have a very painful seroma. Will it ever go away?

It has been drained twice. 200 ccs and then a week later 150cc. It is starting to refill. The pain is unbearable. I am now on antibiotics. I keep a compression bandage on it all the time. What can I do so it won't come back, or to eliminate the pain.

Doctor Answers 3

Seroma after surgery

It sounds like you need a drain placed to wick away the fluid and allow the tissue surfaces to stick and heal together so that the fluid has no space to re-accumulate. Good luck and I'm sorry you are struggling... 

Seroma after surgery

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It sounds like you need a drain placed to wick away the fluid and allow the tissue surfaces to stick and heal together so that the fluid has no space to re-accumulate. Good luck and I'm sorry you are struggling... 

Lumpectomy with a painful seroma

The lumpectomy sit can be drained.  It may be more difficult if the fluid is building up where the lymph nodes were removed.

Lumpectomy with a painful seroma

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The lumpectomy sit can be drained.  It may be more difficult if the fluid is building up where the lymph nodes were removed.

Seroma

It is not uncommon to have seroma (fluid collection) after lumpectomy.  Typically, repeated aspiration with compression would be sufficient to treat seroma.  Sometimes, an injection of antibiotics within the space may facilitate reducing the collection.  In severe cases, a drain tube may need to be inserted to keep the space drained continuously.  Pain is from the pressure built within the space.  Once seroma starts to diminish, the pain will get better.  

Best,

Alex Kim, MD

Alex Kim, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Seroma

{{ voteCount >= 0 ? '+' + (voteCount + 1) : (voteCount + 1) }}

It is not uncommon to have seroma (fluid collection) after lumpectomy.  Typically, repeated aspiration with compression would be sufficient to treat seroma.  Sometimes, an injection of antibiotics within the space may facilitate reducing the collection.  In severe cases, a drain tube may need to be inserted to keep the space drained continuously.  Pain is from the pressure built within the space.  Once seroma starts to diminish, the pain will get better.  

Best,

Alex Kim, MD

Alex Kim, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.