I have a hard "ridge" or "edge" all along one of my incisions of my breast reduction. Is it normal? (Photo)

It seems like it might be the internal stitches pulling and that I have some swelling going on, but I really have no idea. It's pink and not red, not painful, and isn't warmer than the rest of my breast. I can feel the stitches if I feel really softly. The other side does not have this, and is healing much flatter. I'm one week post op, so I can't imagine this being a keloid.

Doctor Answers 3

Breast reduction

Thanks for your question.  Based on your description and the appearance this appears to be normal healing at one week after surgery.  It is not unusual for the 2 sides to appear different, and I would encourage patience.  The incisions and breast will be healing/recovering for the next few months and will continue to change.  Main concerns at this stage would be infections or delayed wound healing, but there are no signs of that at this time.  Continue to follow up with your surgeon and follow their recommendations.


Pasadena Physician

Incision issue

You are way too early in the healing process.  You are best to follow your surgeon's instructions regarding wound care as you progress.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Hello,

The ridge or edge along the incision could just be swelling due to that you are only one week post-op. A keloid scar could take up to 18 months after to appear, so it only being one week post-op it may not be a keloid. The swelling could be due to the inside stitches as well. I suggest consulting with your surgeon on any of your concerns such as possible scars after you are healed. A Board Certified Plastic Surgeon would be able to help you through your healing time. Thank you for your question and have a great day!

Sam Speron, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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