Residual tissue or not? (photos)

I had gyno surgery 3.5 weeks ago and my left pec seems to either have residual tissue or some swelling still. I had gland and lipo done to remove gyno from both pecs. I know it is early but this scares me to have to have revision surgery possibly. Will it get better? My doctor says to wait and see but it scares me. Any help is appreciated!

Doctor Answers 5

Assymetry & Swelling Following Your Gynecomastia Procedure

Asymmetry during the healing process is not at all uncommon after any breast surgery.
Also, your incisions will go through a maturation #process following #Gynecomastia #surgery. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the #healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.
Bruising and #swelling are normal and usually increase slightly after the removal of any tape or foam. The bruising will decrease over 3-4 weeks, but may last as long as 6 weeks. The majority of the swelling will be gone within the first 3-4 weeks. However, it may take 6-9 weeks to disappear completely.
Also, as you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue. The #compression garment helps reduce the swelling, and the longer it is worn, the more quickly you will #heal. It can also assist in the retraction of the skin. If you have any concerns about #healing, its


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Postop swelling

Thanks for your question.  It is likely that you still have residual swelling less than a month out from surgery this can last about 3 months or so.  It can be disconcerting when you have asymmetric swelling but this can be quite normal.  Strictly follow your postop restrictions and continue your scheduled visits with your surgeon to make sure that you are healing properly.  Some light  compression such as under armor tank tops can help reduce postop swelling and can be worn inconspicuously.  Check with your surgeon first before changing your routine.  Best of luck. 

Jacob Bloom, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Swelling after gynecomastia surgery?

It is very difficult only weeks after surgery to understand this type of contour change. It can represent swelling, fluid collections, irregular resection, or others. In most cases, things like this turn out to be swelling which resolves over the course of 3 to 6 months. At that time, if there are any concerns, you should discuss them with your plastic surgeon.

Ira H. Rex lll, MD
Fall River Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Residual tissue?

Thank you for your question and photos.  It is likely that you are seeing swelling after your surgery.  However without photos of you before surgery or more importantly, an in-person evaluation, it is nearly impossible to confirm this.  At 3.5 weeks post-op, you are still in what I consider to be the healing process so you should wait until at least the three month mark before assessing your final result.

All the best,

Dr. Results
Miami, FL

Residual tissue or not?

Thank you for your question and I am sorry that you are worried about your results. Unfortunately without pre surgery pictures or an in-person evaluation it is difficult to know if this area is swelling or residual glandular tissue. Based on its appearance, location, and timing it is most likely swelling and will resolve spontaneously. Gynecomastia tissue is typically very firm while swelling is softer and more spongy.  I hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.