Is there a reason some people have that large scar on their stomach? I want to be sure that's from a TT

Doctor Answers 5

I want to be sure that's from a tummy tuck.

The tummy tuck scar can be variable depending on the amount of skin excess, though in general a full tummy tuck will result in a scar at the level of the typical c-section and run hip to hip. During consultation you can ask your surgeon to draw the "line" to help you understand what to expect.

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Tummy tuck scar

Thank you for your question.

The scar from a tummy tuck depends on the patient and the surgeon’s technique. A tummy tuck scar should look like a longer C-section scar brought out into the hip area and placed a little lower than a typical C-section scar. It should be a fine incision line that refines over time but every patient can heal slightly different depending on their genetics, skin type, age, diet, external factors etc that is why you may see a variety of scar types. There are scar treatments such as silicone strips, creams and laser treatments that can also help further reduce the appearance of surgical scars. Best of luck.

James Fernau, MD, FACS
Board Certified ENT
Board Certified Plastic Surgery
Member of ASPS, ASAPS, ISAPS, The Rhinoplasty Society, AAFPRS, OTO/HNS, ASLMS, International Federation for Adipose Therapeutics & Science

James Fernau, MD, FACS
Pittsburgh Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Tummy tuck

Hello and thank you for your question. If you are an appropriate candidate, a tummy tuck can be done through a low and short incision, all completely below the bikini line.  Your muscles can also be plicated resulting in a flat abdomen.  Make sure you specifically look at before and after pictures of real patients who have had this surgery performed by your surgeon and evaluate their results.  The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 67 reviews

Scars on abdomen

Any operation on the abdomen or the contents inside the abdomen will require a scar.  So, without more detail, I can't answer your question.  If your question is about the placement of a tummy tuck scar, you need to look no further than this website, Real Self, there are plenty of before and after pictures for you to look through.  A tummy tuck procedure basically is a trade, the scar for the flat tummy, if you are OK with the scar, then you will do fine with a tummy tuck.

David Finkle, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

There can be lots of reasons for large scars on the tummy

There can be many reasons for a large scar on the tummy, and they don't all have to do with tummy tuck.  Even a scar that is horizontally oriented and low on the tummy could have been from another kind of operation.  You will have to be more specific and descriptive in your question for us to provide you with any useful answer.  One general comment I can make about tummy tuck scars, however, is that if done correctly, the scar actually begins with the preoperative planning of the operation and proper selection of the position and orientation of the scar.  The scar from a tummy tuck should be very low at the extreme bottom of the abdomen just above the pubis, and extending along the groin creases.  It should also be planned to avoid excess tension, and the wound should be closed in such a way as results in a very thin, fine scar.  This is a very reliable and reproducible formula for successful managment of aesthetic tummy tuck scars.  Tummy tuck scars should not be grotesque.  I hope this helps.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.