Can this be fixed and will I ever be able to use tampons again? (photos)

I delivered a 9 pound baby. I have urgency and use the bathroom often. I basically have no vaginal muscles. What procedure would help me most? Is there 1 procedure that can fix it all?

Doctor Answers 6

Urinary urgency is not a sign of vaginal laxity

Urinary urgency is caused by many different things and affects women with or without childbirth. You need to see your gynecologist or urogynecologist for an evaluation. Urgency is not treated with surgery.

Evaluation needed

For the issues that you describe you first need to have an evaluation by your gynecologist.  The urgency and frequency issues you mentioned may be alleviated by medication.  ThermiVa can also help with the urgency as well the laxity.

Camille Cash, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Urgency after delivery - fixable?

Thank you for your question and congratulation on your new baby. An evaluation by your Gynecologist is definitely a must. Surgery doesn't help with urgency but procedures like ThermiVa can. ThermiVa is a radiofrequency procedure that uses controlled heat to help with various birth-related outcomes such as incontinence, urgency, dryness and laxity. We have received a lot of positive feedback. Good luck!

Brian M. Kinney, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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ThermiVA Results

Hi and thank you for your question.

We have found ThermiVa to be very effective for tightening the vaginal muscles. Our patients report significant improvements in urgency and stress incontinence. In addition, every patient reports overall tightening and strengthening of the vaginal canal. Patients also report this being noted by their sexual partners. Also, thus far all patients have noticed improvements in sensation and lubrication.

Three treatments are recommended about four weeks apart. Maintenance treatments are recommended yearly.

Best,

Dr. Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

Vaginal Urgency

I suggest you see an expert, ThermiVA or the Juliet procedure or a combination may help.  However, you may need reconstructive work but a formal evaluation is needed.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 168 reviews

Childbirth of a 9 pound baby with the urge to go often. Can this be fixed?

Dear Shana300,

Thank you for writing in with your question and concerns.  Unfortunately, your photos didn't come out so I cannot tell anything about your bottom from those.  However, the umbrella of damage from childbirth can affect bladder, bowel and sexual function.  Feeling too wide or loose during sex or just in general, and not having your tampons stay in place like they used to are due to the stretch of the vaginal walls, and can be fixed with vaginal reconstruction including vaginal rejuvenation surgeries, and possibly with the non-surgical, no downtime radiofrequency treatment called ThermiVa.  The urge to go can be related to bladder damage or irritation and you should see your obstetrician/gynecologist to rule out a bladder infection and assess you for pelvic relaxation.  You may also need to see a urologist to address the urge component which can be due to an over-active muscle in the bladder wall many times and can be treated with an anti-spasmodic medication.

If you do not have much pelvic relaxation documented and don't want to take meds for the rest of your life, the ThermiVa may be a good option as it can tighten the vaginal tissues, improve sexual sensation and calm down the spasming muscle in the bladder.  However, it is not a permanent solution and annual maintenance treatments may be needed.

You can read more about vaginal rejuvenation surgeries and ThermiVa at the link below.

I hope this information is helpful.

Sincerely,

Troy Robbin Hailparn, MD, FACOG
Cosmetic Gynecology Center of San Antonio

Troy Hailparn, MD
San Antonio OB/GYN
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.