Are my breasts too close together? Do I need another surgery? (Photo)

ok idk where to start I had surgery like 3 months now in my profile there are earlier pictures but my doc origanaly cut to mych of my left brest and I had a lift and I have 550cc and am Its been crazy now is that I can lift my arms up I cant do a push up because it hurt so mad feels like my skin is going to rip any how my left implant sits so close to my right bob that there is no space that separates them I hate them what shold I do do I need a nother surgery

Doctor Answers 12

Symmastia after lift/aug

Sorry to hear about your situation.  Thank you for supplying photos for review. As other doctors have pointed out, you have symmastia.  Your breasts are too close to each other and you have obvious asymmetry.  Additonally, your right nipple is laterally (to the side) displaced because of the inner displacement of the right implant.  You will definitely require further surgery to fix this problem.  If your implants are on top of the muscle, changing to a submuscular position with/without ADM or Seri will help.  If you are already under the muscle, you will very likely require some support from ADM/Seri.  I would suggest that your implants are too big and that you downsize.  You may wish to consult with a different surgeon and get several opinions before proceeding with revisionary surgery.  It would also be helpful to wait a few more months to make sure your swelling resolves and to see where the implants end up.  Make sure you seek out a board certified plastic surgeon with experience in revisionary breast surgery.  Good luck.  

Yes. Revision!

Thank you for the pictures I'm so sorry about your result. You definitely need a revision. Not for their breast being too close together for the obvious asymmetry of your breast and your nipples. I recommend downsizing your implants greatly and having a breast lift.

Cleavage After Breast Augmentation and Lift

Unfortunately, your pictures and history suggest the presence of several problems including breast asymmetry, recurrent breast sag and synmastia. These problems will definitely require surgical correction. Synmastia, in particular, can be an extremely difficult problem to fix and there's no consensus amongst surgeons regarding the best surgical approach. A variety of surgical options are currently available and these need to be tailored to meet the patient's specific needs.

Under these circumstances, it's important to consult a board certified plastic surgeon with experience in this area. This surgeon should be able to perform a physical examination and formulate a treatment plan that addresses your anatomic findings and achieves your aesthetic goals.

Are my breasts too close together? Do I need another surgery?

I'm very sorry to see and hear of your experience.  You do have symmastia and a revision will be necessary.  The revision will require the use of an acellular dermis to buttress the space between your implants.  However he will also have significant nipple areola asymmetry which should be revised at the same time good luck.

Symmastia

Good news is your situation can be fixed but the bad news is that only another surgery can accomplish this. I would however suggest you wait another 2-3 months before such a procedure though. Your best bet will be to decrease implant size to prevent this from recurring and to use an ADM or SERI to support and redefine the lost separation between your breasts. 

Marc Polecritti, DO
Spring Hill Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Symmastia and Revision Surgery

Your photos show that you have symmastia, or a lack of sufficient space between the breasts, as well as asymmetry. You will need revisional surgery to correct these problems.
As it is only three months after surgery and tissues are likely tight and firm, I would recommend waiting for further healing and relaxation of the tissues.... between 6 months to even one year from the surgery, depending on your exam. Seek a board certified plastic surgeon that routinely performs revisional breast implant surgery. 

Sam Gershenbaum, DO
Aventura Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

Synmastia

You definitely have synmastia.  This requires a revision to correct.  Ideally the revision would utilize a material such as SERI to prevent recurrence of this problem.

Shim Ching, MD
Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Revision

You have symmastia.  you need revision surgery.  Find a plastic surgeon that has experience correcting this problem.  In skilled hands you should obtain good results.
Good luck,
Ary Krau MD FACS

Ary Krau, MD, FACS
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 271 reviews

Synmastia not the major problem

So I am sorry you are unhappy with your results, but if I am being completely honest and forthcoming, you have a right to be dissatisfied.  Your before pics show that a mastopexy-augmentation would have been a great surgery for you.  However, the execution of the surgery leaves a lot to be desired.  Yes, you have some degree of synmastia where your breasts are close together.  However, the degree to which your nipples are asymmetric (along with overall breast shape) is a bigger concern and can be a harder problem to fix.  Revisionary cosmetic breast surgery is a major undertaking.  My recommendation is to see several surgeons who specialize in this.  I would back off on the size of your implants and depending on what technique was used for your lift, move both nipples into a more natural and cosmetically pleasing location.

Are my breasts too close together? Do I need another surgery?

It does appear that the space between the breast is lost and that you have symmastia. The healing of the breast revision is also delayed and the result seems uneven. You may want to consult with a Board Certified plastic surgeon for a revision once the breasts have had sufficient time to heal.

Michael E. Ciaravino, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 115 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.