Is contracting normal? (Photo)

So I got my breast augmentation! :) everything went great, love the results so far. My PS said my implants will be high for awhile. I got submuscular saline 420cc. I looked through my papers and can't find anything about what I'm going through. Every time I use my chest or arms, my chest contracts and becomes tight! More my left (I'm left handed). Is this something I should contact my PS about or is this normal? Thank you for all the advice.

Doctor Answers 7

Is contracting normal?

Hello!  Thank you for your question. Animation is a potential issue with bread augmentation in the sub pectoral position.  It often times improves over time as the muscle and tissue stretch. At this time postop, I would continue to follow your surgeon's instructions and restrictions until the swelling subsides and the implants settle into their desired positions.  If after this time, the animation deformity is still bothersome or detrimental to you, consideration for pocket exchange to a sub glandular or sub fascial position should be entertained.

Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Contracting sensation


Tingly, contracting or vibrating sensations can all be normal post op as your tissues are inflamed and getting used to the objects placed inside. This doesn't sound concerning however there is no substitute for your Plastic Surgeon's assessment. I recommend that you contact them with any concerns.

All the best

Is contracting normal?

Thank you for your question and photograph.  This does sound to be typical for a breast augmentation and is the result of swelling to your skin and muscle as a result of surgery.  This should resolve on its own given enough time, but should any change in your breast appearance take place, contact your surgeon for an in-person evaluation. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Is contracting normal?

Could be normal but we can not examine you! So best to see or call your chosen operative surgeon of ANY postop issues..>>>>>>>>>>>

Tight post aug

This is due to the muscle contarcting and since you are early in your recovery phase I would not worry about it.give it some more time.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Movement of submuscular implants is normal with muscle contraction

If you think about it, the breast is not normally a submuscular organ.  It sits on top of the muscle and hangs freely.  Thus, we don't normally see motion of the breasts with contraction of the pectoralis muscles.  We put implants under the muscle because our experience has shown us that there are a number of advantages to doing this.  However, when we do this we change some of those anatomical relationships, and one of those is that now the implant is intimately associated with the muscle.  And, it is associated in a way that any contraction of the muscle pushes down and out on the implant, causing it to move.  This is called "dynamic distortion," and it is quite common.  This will be more pronounced in the early weeks and months after surgery, as the tissues are still tight and accommodating to the implants.  It will improve as time goes on, but depending upon how much the surgeon released and raised the muscle and how it was done, there may always be a bit of motion in the breasts with muscle contraction.  Your arms are attached to the pectoralis muscles, so even arm movement can often cause this too.  Discuss this with your surgeon so that he or she can properly advise you based upon the degree of real time movement that is still present and your time course after surgery.  Good luck.


Hello, some patients will notice their muscles spasm intermittently for a few weeks after their BA surgery, and it usually resolves.  I think it is always worthwhile running by symptoms with your surgeon's office just to be sure you are healing properly.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.