How does cartilage heal? Does callus form on cartilage?

The reason I am asking this is because my hump was removed during rhinoplasty and is now back, and hard to touch but I did not have this hump at cast removal. The hump had been slightly puffy and tender to touch but it has now hardened completely

Doctor Answers 5


One possibility is that swelling immediately after surgery may have camouflaged a residual hump that then became visible once swelling resolved.  Sometimes a rasping procedure under local anesthesia in the office can correct residual hump irregularities after a rhinoplasty.  Best wishes, Dr. T. 

How does cartilage heal? Does callus form on cartilage?

To respond you would need only in person examinations. But it is possible for nasal hump to become calloused! 

Hard dorsum

If it was gone early post-op, then it is likely scar tissue that has developed. Hard to say without being a witness to the process.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Cartilage hump

Yes, cartilage can form "callus". It is more likely to be scar/fibrosis though. Your question is better answered by your surgeon as he/she knows exactly what was done and how your healing progressed.

Robert H. Hunsaker, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Does callus form on cartilage?

Hi Layla,

What I can see that your hump reappeared. This is because when removing the hump surgeon has to use a file/rasp to give it a nice shape.Bone dust that accumulates in the process is normally thoroughly irrigated to avoid this complication.

Some bone dust that may remain then will calcify to show it the way you feel it now.This bone dust, if its sitting in front of the cartilage part of the nose even that area will feel hard like bone since its covering over the cartilage.

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