Is it safe to bath and swim? (photo)

I have an open wound on breast (see earlier questions ) and doctor says I can bath and swim but others say it can slow healing progress. What's the truth

Doctor Answers 8

Is it safe to bath and swim with open breast implant wound?

I would not recommend that you bathe or swim in public pools, Lasix or streams because of the risk of infection.  Personally I recommended patients who have open wounds after breast surgery he is Epsom salts soaks in their own tub until the wound has closed.

Restrictions with open wounds

vary widely by surgeon to surgeon but in my practice, open wounds can certainly be wet and dunked and depending on what the wound looks like and what kind of water they are in will determine whether they can sit submerged with the wound under water.  Risks for infection for open wounds are minuscule and easily treated with antibiotics... as your wound is already colonized with bacteria... its certainly not a sterile wound.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Breast augmentation

Thank you for your question. I recommend that my patients avoid baths or pools until at least 6 weeks after surgery. I would also avoid submerging the wounds if you have any open wounds. I would discuss with your plastic surgeon and see what their thoughts are. Good luck. 

Arun Rao, MD
Tucson Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Incision Concerns with Bathing and Swimming

Hello,


I do not allow my patients to swim or use baths/hot tubs as long as they have any open areas on incisions due to the increased infection risk. You will hear varying opinions about this and different timelines recommended but when in doubt, a little extra caution can't hurt.

All the best

Wound Healing

I do not believe that there is one right answer to your question and many options out there.  However, I find it better to be on the safe side.  If you have an open wound then there is always the possibility of infection if you are in dirty water (i.e., pool, Jacuzzi, lake, etc.)  Showering and letting clean water run over the area should cause no problems.  You definitely should follow up with your surgeon regularly for wound check to make sure things are healing properly.

Safe to bathe and swim after open wound

Thank you for your question.

If you were my patient, I would advise you to NOT submerge your incisions at least until after 4-6 weeks. I believe it is important the incision heals as much as possible before submerging them- if you have an open wound, I'd wait to submerge as it can be very difficult to make sure the is water clean enough not to irritate the wound. However, your chosen plastic surgeon knows your particular case best and it's important to follow their post operative directions. Best of luck in your recovery.

Fred Hackney, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Is it safe to go into a bath

Thank you for your question. I understand your frustration, there's lots of different thoughts out there amongst wound care specialists. I tell my patients it's ok to have their wound submerge under clean warm bath water for 15 minutes a day ( not pool or public jacuzzis). This keeps the wound clean and promotes healing. Other local wound care must also be performed. Please make sure your surgeon sees you regularly and follow their instructions. Good luck. 

Mehdi K. Mazaheri, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Wait 6 weeks before submerging in a bath or swimming.

There are varying opinions on how soon you can submerge your incision after a breast enhancement procedure, but in general it’s safe to wait at least 6 weeks before you take a bath, swim or get into a hot tub. Of course, your plastic surgeon has given you the greenlight, and has firsthand knowledge of your situation and how well your incisions are healing. Just keep in mind, bathing at home in a clean bathtub presents the least amount of risk to you, whereas swimming or going into a hot tub can expose your open wound to infection and should be avoided.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.