Am I bottoming out? (photos)

So I am 10.5 weeks post op. I had 365cc silicone under the muscle. I followed instructions and wore my post surgical bra for 6 weeks day and night. My incisions were a bit above the crease as my surgeon said that way they're hidden if bikini rides up. My left breast is naturally quite a bit bigger.. Half a cup to a cup. I feel like my left breast is bottoming out and I'm not sure what to do as my surgeon is on leave till September.

Doctor Answers 6

Bottoming out / pocket expansion

Yes - it does look like you have signs of "bottoming out" - more properly called inferior pocket expansion.

Best to discuss with your surgeon.  If caught early, it can sometimes be treated with external support.  Otherwise, a pocket plication surgery may be needed.

Bottoming out: diagnosis and correction

Yes, you demonstrate some mild bottoming out. Bottoming out of breast implants occurs when they drop below the existing inframammary folds, creating a "bottom-heavy" appearance.  This is evident on your lateral (side) view, which demonstrates greater breast volume below the nipple than above.  Breast implants always descend to some degree after surgery.  Final position does not occur for approximately 6 months to one year.  With this in mind, you should be wearing a support bra 24/7 (yes, that includes sleeping in it) for the next several months.  The bra should push your implants up, reducing the effects of gravity on the implants as you continue to heal.  A decision regarding any further surgery should be deferred until a minimum of 6 months (and preferably one year) after your augmentation.

Ronald Friedman, MD
Plano Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

2 months post op, some advices:

Thanks for the question. In my practice, after performing a BA I recommend to my patients to limit the movement of the arms for two weeks. After that, you can move your arms taking care and always with common sense. 
In this regard, it's not advisable to carry heavy weights to prevent the implant out of position, and allow the formation of the physiological capsule around the implant, also to avoid pain and breast swelling. Kind regards

Emmanuel Mallol Cotes, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 174 reviews

Am I bottoming out?

Thank you of your question and for sharing your photographs.  Though nothing replaces an in-person examination it appears that you are showing some early signs of bottoming out with the implants having fallen a bit too low on your chest.  Maintain your breasts supported and see your surgeon to confirm the diagnosis and discuss treatment options. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Bottomming Out

Hello,Unfortunately it does appear that your left breast crease may be compromised. You should be seen by your Plastic Surgeon in person to discuss correction. All the best

Am I bottoming out?

I am sorry to hear about/see the problems you are having after breast augmentation surgery. I think your concerns are appropriate; your breast implants do seem to sit somewhat low on your chest wall, consistent with breast implant displacement ("bottoming out”).  Also, consistent with the breast implant positioning problem, the nipple areola complexes seem to be sitting relatively high, because the breast implants have settled too low.  I think you will likely benefit from revisionary breast surgery which will likely involve capsulorraphy ( internal suture repair). This procedure serves to reconstruct the lower poles of the breasts and prevent migration of the breast implants too far inferiorly. Associated issues with positioning of nipple/areola complexes and visibility of the inframmammary fold scars should improve with this operation.  Make sure that the plastic surgeon who does this procedure for you can demonstrate significant experience with revisionary breast surgery.  I hope this, and the attached link (dedicated to corrective surgery for bottoming out concerns), helps.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.