Best Treatment for Melasma on the Face?

What is the best way to get rid of melasma patches on my face? I have a large brown spot on my forehead and chin that was diagnosed as melasma. I have been using triluma cream and it has lightened but it darkens the second I step outdoors. Is there anything else that I can do to get rid of this?

Doctor Answers 2

Best Treatment for Melasma

Melasma has multiple causes and therefore has multiple treatments.  It is likely a lifelong condition but can be held under control.  Steps to successfully treat melasma inclu

-Avoid UV light and exposure and wear daily sunscreen

-Investigate hormonal causes 

-Use of topicals (skin lighteners, retinols, etc)

-Use of chemical peels (i.e. melanage, etc)

-Use of LASERS (i.e. IPL, erbium, Nd:YAG, ablative treatments)


Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 143 reviews

Optimal treatment for Melasma requires care by of a board-certified dermatologist

- See a board-certified dermatologist for higher strength hydroquinone and/or topical retinoid to be applied at night. Consider antioxidant vitamin C serum in the morning.

- Spectra Laser (Q-switched Nd:Yag laser) by Lutronic is the new standard of care for melasma

- Daily high SPF sunscreen application, reapply every 2 hours between 10am and 4pm when you are outdoors. Consider sun protective clothing, broad-brim hats. Plan your outdoor activities before 10am or after 4pm.

- Discontinue all estrogen-containing contraceptive

- Gentle cleansing. Excessive irritation from vigorous washing can lead to postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

- Consider combination of microdermbrasion, IPL (for fair-skin individuals only) and/or Nd:Yag laser supervised by a board-certified dermatologist.

William Ting, MD
Bay Area Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.