Tummy Tuck Dog Ear Scar to Left Side?

I had a tummy tuck close to 2 years ago but have a " dog ear" scar to left side. How can this be corrected and what is normally the price range?

Doctor Answers 16

A couple of ways to correct a dog ear 2 years post-op

At this stage your scarring is certainly mature and stable.  Thus, the only way to correct the dog ear would be with another minor surgical procedure.  What is done will depend upon how your dog ear looks.  Sometimes the dog ear is created more due to fullness of the fatty layer and a "crimping" or folding of the fat layer at the end extreme of the scar.  In these instances I have had great success at correcting the dog ear with a small amount of superficial liposuction just under the skin.  This allows for only a small stab incision for the liposuction, usually within the existing scar so no additional scar, and no additional length of the scar either.  If there is still redundancy of the skin with enough excess to fold and cause the dog ear, then this will need to be excised completely, and this will of necessity require some additional length of your scar in that area, although most times it is not a huge amount.  Both of these can easily be done under local anesthesia.  I normally charge only for the room and equipment when doing these on my own patients, but these fees and revision policies will vary from surgeon to surgeon.  If I am correcting such a deformity on a patient I have never seen before, it is billed as a new procedure, and I charge my full surgeon fee.  Good luck.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

Tummy Tuck Dog Ear Excision?

Excision of the excess skin/adipose tissue at the and of the tummy tuck incision line is a relatively minor procedure involving direct excision of the excess tissue and/or liposuction surgery.  Much of what is recommended to you,  and the costs involved, will depend on your specific concerns. Communicate these concerns carefully with your chosen plastic surgery.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1,448 reviews

Tummy Tuck Dog Ear Scar to Left Side?

This is usually treated by extending the incision by an inch or so and removing the excess skin. If your own surgeon does this the fee should be nominal.

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

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Left sided dog ear on tummy tuck

This happens on occasion with abdominoplasty. There are options. A completely non invasive option would be CoolSculpting. This can freeze the fat and deliver an improved contour. More traditional options are some liposuction, or resection of skin/soft tissue. This is a much smaller procedure than the original surgery and is usually well tolerated. The cost will depend on the extent of the surgery, the method used, the cost of the surgery center, and if the original surgeon is doing it. Please speak with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Together, you will figure out a plan.

Jeffrey J. Roth, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
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Remedy for Dog Ear Scar

Dear Ariel99,

The dog ear indicates that the incision needs to be extended another 2-4 cm in order to get it to lie down flat. Also, some of the underlying fat is usually removed simultaneously to ensure a smooth contour.

Sometimes the so-called dog ear results if you had a tremendous amount of skin laxity. There comes a point when the surgeon is operating on you that he can’t go any further with the incision because you are lying on the operating room table. In a case like that, it may be reasonable to charge a small fee for supply costs and staffing to do a touchup operation. Also, it is good advice to bring up the subject of revisions within the first six to twelve months of an operation. Surgeons usually feel more generous with touchups the closer they are to the original operation as opposed to waiting two years to address.

Talk to your surgeon. It may be worthwhile to him or her to help you for the sake of good will.

Best of luck to you.

Robert D. Wilcox, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.2 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Tummy tuck dog ear repair

Hello,

Thank you for the question.  A "dog ear" is often an excess of skin at the end of the incision but it can also be some excess fat as well.  Either direct excision or liposuction will help correct the dog ear if fat is a prominent component of the dog ear.  If the dog is ear is primarily excess skin then direct excision will suffice.  Both of these can be performed under local anesthesia and the cost should be less than 1000.

All the best,

Dr. Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 159 reviews

Dog Ear Scar From Tummy Tuck #tummytuck

If you were my patient and you really had a dog ear I would excise it in the office under local at no cost. Just talk to your surgeon and see what their policy is. 

Richard J. Brown, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Tummy Tuck Dog Ear Scar to Left Side?

At 2 years your scar should be mature and only a minor procedure under local anesthesia should be required. The degree of minor surgery will depend on how it looks but usually an excision with removal of redundant tissue is all that is required.

Paul Vitenas, Jr., MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 107 reviews

Dog ear scars

A dog ear is due to closing an elliptical skin excision.  If it has not settled down in 6 months it most likely needs a revision.  This can usually be done as a simple office procedure and occasionally requires a little liposuction.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Dog ear treatment

Difficult to make any recommendations without a photo or exam.  But generically speaking, a dog ear may require a small scar revision procedure.  Depending on the size and extend of the dog ear, it may only require local anesthesia. Please talk to your PS to learn more about your options.

 

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 205 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.