Botox in jaw and lips, will it effect my breathing?

Av just had botox and am scared its gonna effect my breathing

Doctor Answers 12

Botox Side Effects: Does it Effect Breathing?

The FDA requires possible side effects for Botox be listed, but breathing issues would be extremely rare. If you do have any concerns, contact your medical professional immediately. Best, Dr. Emer

Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 159 reviews


Thank you for your question nicola8279. Botox is a purified protein used to address wrinkles associated with facial expressions. Botox can be used in the lower face and low doses are used in these areas. The most common side effect is difficulty moving the lips, particularly when sucking on a straw. We discuss these possibilities during the initial consultation. I have never seen a patient who had difficulty breathing after a Botox treatment. Please consult with a doctor for specific recommendations.  Good luck!

Alex Eshaghian, MD, PhD
Encino Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Effects of Botox

Hi Nicola, The muscles of facial expression do not have a significant impact on nasal breathing. It is unlikely that Botox in your jaw and lips will have any impact on your breathing. 
Best, Javad Sajan, MD

Javad Sajan, MD
Seattle Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Botox in lips and jaw - can it cause breathing problems?

This should not be a problem you worry about. The FDA has required this label as a warning but it hasn't happened with cosmetic doses of Botox. When the neck is treated for spasm in cerebral palsy, stroke patients, or torticollis patients, there have been some of the breathing problems noted. It happens with much higher dosing. It has happened once in the past as well when the physician didn't use Botox but a lab reagent and said it was Botox. The strength was extremely high and led to problems as well.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Botox injections

Botox injections are usually placed fairly superficially and should not impact your breathing. Best of luck with your results.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Botox and Breathing

Thanks for your questions. Botox is an extremely safe product with a long standing safety record. As long as the correct dosage is placed, you should not have an issue. Good luck!

Satyen Undavia, MD
Philadelphia Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Botox in jaw and lips, will it effect my breathing?

Thanks for your question and as always, we recommend that you see and have these injections performed in the offices of a board certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon.  Botox is a safe and wonderful treatment – and you should not have any concerns about breathing or anything related to that. These issues should have been addressed when you had your consultation and if you have questions, please discuss with your provider who again, should put your mind at ease.

Michael Gold, MD
Nashville Dermatologic Surgeon
3.9 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Botox and breathing

Botox is a medication injected into muscles to weaken them for softer and less noticeable wrinkles. Botox is a safe medication. It is the #1 most commonly performed cosmetic office procedure. I'm not aware of any reports of breathing issues after Botox injection in the face.Knowing the risks of any new medication or procedure is a smart thing. Safety comes first. 

Victor Chung, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Botox in jaw and lips, will it effect my breathing?

Thank you for sharing your question.  Botox placed in the lips and jaw will not affect your breathing ability as the muscles responsible are located far away from these areas.  Hope this helps

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews


The small number of units injected into the labella, forehead or for the crows feet should not cause you any issues with you breathing.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.