Will Acell help an open wound resulting from radiation following bilateral mastectomy performed 2.5 years ago? Shirley L.

2.5 years ago I had radical bilateral mastectomy. After radiation and numerous surgeries, and hyperbaric treatments the end result is necrosis with undermining and a remaining open wound measuring 3" x 2" x 3 cm deep.

Doctor Answers 3

Acell and radiation wounds

Most of the time you will need to rotate new tissue into the area. However, I don't know how you've been caring for this wound. Sometimes it is possible to change the wound care regimen and get healing. Once I met a man who'd been cleaning his wound with peroxide daily. He kept that wound open for over 10 years. When we got him on an appropriate regimen the wound healed. I don't know what your wound care has been like. I suspect, if you've had hyperbaric treatments, that you have been given pretty much everything that would be helpful. 

Acell is a great product. It might work, but you need not only healing but a stable scar that doesn't break open. I don't know that Acell could give you that. Furthermore, I have had trouble getting insurance coverage for the product, so it is possible that you would be paying out of pocket.

Talk to your plastic surgeon about this. You'll get an informed opinion customized on your exam.

Milwaukee Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Breast reconstruction

You need healthy tissue to reconstruct this wound and can either do a free flap such as the DIEP flap or LD flap (back muscle).  Make sure to see a PS who can offer you all types of reconstruction.

Anh Lee, MD
El Paso Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Breast radiated wound

  Open wounds of radiated tissue is very difficult to heal. In my practice that will require surgery. A muscle flap is needed where the muscle will bring new blood supply and new health tissue for complete healing.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.