Do you have to go on Accutane before you have a Profractional laser? (photos)

I'm very interesting in getting the pro fractional laser done to my face for acne scarring . The dermatologist asked me if I still have breakouts. I told her if I do, they are few and far between. She recommended going on Accutane for several months before getting the laser performed. Is this a typical response? I do not want to go on Accutane again, I took it 9 years ago. Thanks!

Doctor Answers 3

Accutane and Lasers

Based on the photo you provided, I would not suggest going back on Accutane. I normally suggest being off of Accutane for a minimum of 12 months prior to an aggressive laser treatment. I also suggest using a topical Retin-A product with Hydroquinone for at least a month prior to treating the skin with a fractionated laser. This combination will prepare your skin for the laser and may even help with the breakouts by helping with exfoliation. You would then discontinue using that product about 3 days prior to treatment and begin using it again about  2-4 weeks post procedure depending on your healing. I would like to suggest you seeing a local facial plastic surgeon for another opinion as well. I wish you the best!

New Orleans Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Accutane and Laser Treatments

In my opinion, you do not need to go back on Accutane based on your photo. Also, after being on Accutane you can not have ANY laser procedures done for 6 months after your last dose of the drug; as it is a contraindication due to photosensitivity.

I hope this answers your questions.

#Accutane  #lasertreatments   #fractional

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Go back on Accutane or proceed with fractional laser

It is my opinion based on the photograph that you could get fractional laser resurfacing without going back on Accutane. Perhaps you can seek another opinion locally.

Dr H Karamanoukian
#RealSelf100 Member

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