Rib Cadaver - grow together?

if cadaver rib are used for narrowing tip and enhance bridge for thick skin nose. Will the fascia harvesting could be avoided ? Can cadaver rib grow together with the nose tissue like harvesting your own cartiage?

Doctor Answers 9

Rib Cadaver - grow together?

Harvested rib cartilage is usually used without fascia. The rib cartilage is anchored and stabilized to the bone and cartilage of the nose.


San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Rhinoplasty

Cadaveric rib grafts can be used to narrow the tip and enhance the nasal bridge. Fascia is usually harvested for diced cartilage. If the cartilage is not being diced and carved carefully with smooth edges, then the rib does not necessarily need an additional fascia harvest. Cadaveric rib has a higher rate of resorption over time compared to using your own rib but will incorporate into your nasal tissues if done correctly. Hope this helps!


Johnson C. Lee, MD Plastic Surgery

Johnson C. Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Cadaveric Rib Graft to Nose

There is no reason to wrap a cadaver rib graft with fascia. Such encasement methods are used for autologous diced rib grafts to the nose.

Cadaveric rib

I prefer to use the patient's own rib, if at all possible, but cadaveric rib cartilage is often used in rhinoplasty and has very low complication rates. It does not grow with the nose, which is not an issue with rhinoplasty. The fascia harvesting can be avoided, but considering (1) that the fascia can be a useful resource in performing rhinoplasty and (2) harvesting of the fascia is not associated with any additional recovery, difficulty, or complication beyond that associated with the rib cartilage harvest, I would advise you to not worry too much about the fascia being used. Good luck!

P. Daniel Ward, MD
Salt Lake City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Rhinoplasty: Cadaver rib

Rhinoplasty is a surgery to improve the shape of the nose for breathing or appearance.

Cadaver rib is by definition tissue that is not alive. It does not have the capacity to grow with the nose tissue. Cartilage that is harvested from your body (septum, ear, or rib) has the potential to grow with your body as it is your own tissue. 

Consult with a rhinoplasty surgeon experienced with cartilage grafting who explain what is appropriate for your face for a safe any happy result. Safety comes first. 


Victor Chung, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Growth of Cadaver Rib Cartilage

Although cadaver cartilage can be used to augment or provide support in rhinoplasty surgery I feel that the patients own cartilage is more reliable and cartilage survival more predictable. Fascia can be avoided but this is is frequently used to enhance circulation and avoid irregularities caused by the edges of the cartilage graft.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Cadaver Rib graft?

in most patients a rib graft  is not required. You are better having your own cartilage from your septum or your ear used with or without fascia than using a rib graft in my opinion. See a very experienced  revision  rhinoplasty surgeon for further evaluation. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Cadaver rib

Thank you for the question and I have gotten excellent results with cadaver rib cartilage and in the apprprooiate patients gives excellent results.


Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Rib Cadaver - grow together?

Cadaver rib can be used just the same way your own rib can be used. Studies have shown there to be no difference in complication rate or outcome. However, it is critical that you are in the hands of a surgeon who is very comfortable with and has extensive experience with rib grafts. This is key or you can have warping and shape changes in the years down the road. The rib will never "grow together" with your nose but it will be surrounded by scar tissue (as would your own rib) and will be held in place if put in properly in surgery. Hope that helps!

Jeffrey Watson, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.