Getting rhinoplasty and breast augmentation a week apart?

Hello, I was wondering if it was okey to have two surgeries only days apart. Would there be any risks or side affects from anesthesia, etc? The doctors that are going to be performing my surgeries unfortunately don't work in the same office, but are in the same area so there's no way that I'll be able to have the surgeries performed the same day. Also, would it be better to get the breast augmentation before rhinoplasty? Or rhinoplasty before BA? Thank you in advance.

Doctor Answers 6

You could have rhinoplasty and breast augmentation a week apart.

Dear summerii in Los Angeles:

You are asking all the right questions. Frankly, we have done some sequential operations one day apart. Yes, it is ideal to have both surgeons operate sequentially on the same day. Are you sure there is no way that can be worked out? Generally, it is feasible, even if you do not work in the same surgical facility, exceptions can be made. I would definitely look into that before committing to two separate sessions because it is not economical of time and probably costs more. Generally, when you combine procedures, you save on the operating room and the anesthesiologist fee. Now those two operations do not interfere with each other so the only question about the interval is how short can it be.

The one rule would be to have the breast augmentation first. The reason is, if you have the rhinoplasty and then they are putting you to sleep for the breast augmentation, there are going to be issues with the anesthesia which involves the mouth and face. The anesthesiologist has to put an oxygen mask on your face, and there are other reasons why it is not a good idea to have any kind of manipulation of the face when you are having another operation.

If in the end there is no way to avoid having these done sequentially, then check with both doctors and see what they think would be an adequate interval. You could even speak to the anesthesiologist about that, but I do not think that will be an issue. I would recommend doing the breast augmentation first. Below the collar bone is one territory, and above the collar bone is another, and hopefully all will go well for you.

Best wishes,

Robert Kotler, MD, FACS
Over 4,500 nasal procedures performed

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Multiple Procedures

It's often best to do both procedures combined at the same time so you undergo one anesthesia session and recovery.  It is also usually more cost effective.  Your surgeons should be able to coordinate having this procedure done simultaneously on the same day.  

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Rhinoplasty and Brfeast Augmentation One Week Apart

It is best for the patient to have just one anesthetic and recovery. If you prefer to have 2 surgeons do the work there is no reason that both cannot do the surgery in one facility. It will be safer and also cheaper for you. In our clinic we believe in specialization; the rhinoplasty expert would do the rhinoplasty and another surgeon who focuses on body surgery would do the breast augmentation. 

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Breast augmentation and rhinoplasty combination Its are red and poor my credit card for payment, some valgus at the tract into

 Since both a breast augmentation rhinoplasty procedures are performed under general anesthesia, it probably good idea to separate the 2 procedures by one month, to avoid any anesthetic complications. The only other option would be to have one surgeon perform both procedures, or 2 separate surgeons performing the procedures under one anesthetic.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

Breast augmentation and rhinoplasty surgery with two different surgeons.

Thanks for your question.  Many ABPS board-certified plastic surgeons perform rhinoplasty and breast augmentation at the same time under one general anesthesia.  If there is a specific reason to have two different doctors performing the procedures then I would make every effort to arrange for them to work together under one anesthesia or if absolutely necessary I would choose to separate the anesthetics by a one week time period.  This is not based on any scientific study but just general good advice to allow you some time to commence the recovery and restore circulation to your calves.  If you are young and healthy and absolutely need to separate the procedures into two anesthetics only days apart, I suspect you will do well.  Anesthesia is now so much safer and easier to recover from compared to in the past.  This assumes that you have no unusual medical issues and are not a smoker.Good luck and best wishes.  If you have any doubts you might wish to discuss them with your own internist and be certain that the anesthetists from both offices are aware of your plans.

Jon A. Perlman, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews


Dear summerli, In my practice these procedures are done together at the same time allowing one anesthesia and one recovery period. Perhaps the surgeons would work together in one of the offices so that the procedures could be done together? On occasions in my practice another local surgeon will perform a secondary procedure in my surgical facility at the same time. Since I have a fully accredited operating facility the joining physician must have privileges and meet the requirements of the accrediting body of my facility.   If this is not a possibility then I would suggest speaking with your surgeons regarding the order they are most comfortable with. I would assume the breast augmentation would be done first  and the nose second due to manipulation during anesthesia. Best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 196 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.