Is it neccessary to take Emend before BA?

Got my prescriptions yesterday and the nurse said the Emend is optional but recommended. It is very expensive! I've been under general before and didn't feel sick at all, although it was for a D&C so maybe thats different. I have some zofran at home if needed. I'll get it if I need to, I'd just rather spend the money on new bras, lol.

Doctor Answers 7

Emend before BA?

Emend is touted as being the most effective anti-nausea medication out there, but it is also very expensive. If you are someone who has a really severe problem with post-operative nausea and vomiting it  may be worth it but most patients really don't need it. If you have a conscientious anesthesiologist who is careful with medications and employs all of the other anti nausea medications (like zofran), and you are not someone who easily gets nauseated, then you will likely be fine. Another option is a Scopolamine patch which also works quite well. Using these strategies we find that it is rare patient who needs to us Emend.

Post-op nausea

depends  a lot on what anesthetics were used and what your susceptibility to them are.  If you don't have a horrible history of nausea and vomiting from your prior procedures, you should be able to get by without it.  I use Emend only on patients who describe a horrible recovery following all prior procedures under anesthesia.  Otherwise I employ and Transderm Scopolomine patch, IV Decadron after being put to sleep, and Zofran post-op.  None of my patients who do not report horrible post op nausea and vomiting have any problems.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Emend necessary?

Thank you for your question. Emend is a new anti nausea medicine used in patients after surgery or chemotherapy. As you know, in the drug world, new= expensive. Other medicines such as Phenergan, or zofran are equally effective and much less expensive. Speak to your surgeon about alternatives to the Emend. There are several and you will be comfortable. 
Best wishes,

Postop nausea

In my experience it is very uncommon to have significant nausea after a breast augmentation.  The surgery is relatively short, under 45 minutes, and produces minimal discomfort.  Injecting an intracostal block at the completion of the pocket but before placing the implant usually relieves almost all of the pain.  So, with a short surgery and a need for minimal narcotics, patients almost never need anything for nausea.  In your particular case, you should check with your surgeon to see if there is a specific reason why he believes it is necessary.

Samuel Beran, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Taking Emend prior to surgery?

Emend is an anti-nausea medication.  Many women experience nausea following a general anesthetic, and many of types of narcotic pain medication also cause nausea.  However, as you have already said, Emend is very expensive.  There are other types of anti-nausea medications as well including Phenergan, Zofran, Scopolamine which are less expensive.  I would suggest that you discuss your concerns with your surgeon.  Every surgeon and anesthesiologist will have a different protocol to combat post-operative nausea and vomiting although many will use multiple different medications.  Good luck!

Anureet K. Bajaj, MD
Oklahoma City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Prescriptions

Direct your questions regarding your prescriptions to your surgeon.  The vast majority of my patients do not need nausea medicine.  Let your surgeon know you have zofran at home.

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Emend

Emend is an expensive medication and unless you have a strong history of PONV(post-op nausea and vomiting) filling this prescription is likely excessive. With your prior history of GA and no PONV, you will likely be ok, beyond that, the zofran will likely work if you do experience some nausea. Good luck

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