Mild cellulitis, back on antibiotics, also noticing tethering under right implant at 4 weeks post op. (photos)

I had a Benelli lift on the left side, and a regular incision on the right. I had substantial pain on Tuesday night and my PS put me on 500 mg of cephilexin every 6 hours for the next 6 days. I'm also noticing an indentation under the right breast (not the lifted one) that has been there since the beginning and has not loosened with my daily massages. I am trying not to panic and will see my PS this Friday, but would like to have a few more opinions about what I could be looking at in my future.

Doctor Answers 8

Wait for some time

The final appearance, shape, and movement are not exactly the same as normal breasts. The surgically enlarged breasts do not move in the same way as normal breasts. They tend to be firmer. The contours are usually somewhat different than normal breasts. In some patients these discrepancies may be rather noticeable. Although every effort is made to place the implants symmetrically, complete symmetry is rarely achieved. Immediately after surgery, the breasts are swollen and firmer. The final shape and size is approximated after 2 to 3 months, but up to one year may be required for the end result.

Mild cellulitis, back on antibiotics, also noticing tethering under right implant at 4 weeks post op.

Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well…
I have to say that you are still early on healing process, it is too soon to determine how your results are going to be, per now, they look very nice and beautiful, you can have one bigger than the other, feel swollen and also have bruises and open wounds, it is normal and that can happen Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well..

Tania Medina de Garcia, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 358 reviews

Stitch spitting

Thanks for your inquiry and excellent pictures.  Antibiotics seems like a good idea, please ask your doctor about local woundcare as well like peroxide and Bactroban ointment.  If you do not see quick improvements on the antibiotics, ask if you need a stronger one--cephexelin does not cover resistant organisms, good luck.  

Too early to judge outcome

The infection situation may resolve with antibiotics.  The other things that you are worrying about are not appropriate yet.

Mild cellulitis

Mild cellulitis or irritation to suture material; both should be able to be managed conservatively; my only recommendation is that if you get any leakage of fluid make sure you culture it so that you can hone in on your antibiotics of choice rather than treating it blindly.

Arian Mowlavi, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Your healing is delayed for some reason

as this is not anticipated at 4 weeks post-op.  If your redness spreads further, you must let your surgeon know so consideration of additional antibiotics can be done.  Good wound care is needed to help this heal and fill in.  So keep in touch with your surgeon and follow his/her instructions.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Breast Augmentation Infections

Hello,

I think you should ask your surgeon to refer you to an infectious disease expert; something easy to do here in LA. I do not believe cephalexin is the correct drug to be on, and would prefer you to be taking two drugs to cover MRSA: Bactrim and Clindamycin.

I have to be honest, this doesn't look promising at this point.  If there is any suspicion of implant involvement, the sooner the implants are removed the better.  Implant infection can not be cured with medication, only surgery.

Best of luck.

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Cellulitis

Thank you for the photos and follow your surgeons instructions but ask about removing the exposed sutures which you are reacting to and adding a topical antibiotic like silvadene cream

Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.