Hand Sclerotherapy. I have hard, solid, clotted lumps on hands after 5 weeks causing discoloration. Is this normal?

Hi Doctors. I recently had hand sclerotherapy, which has caused the veins to clot and form hard lumps in most of the veins treated. These seem like solid clots which are more difficult to evacuate and are causing discoloration. Can anyone tell me how long it will take for these lumpy veins to disappear? does it take weeks, months, years even for the body to absorb? I am starting to worry they wont go away and will cause more and more bruises. Thanks!

Doctor Answers 4

Hand veins.

Following hand vein sclerotherapy it is common to form hard areas in the veins.  These are best treated by evacuation of the clots with a needle.  I evacuate these clots usually at the 3 week post treatment mark and then again 3 weeks later if necessary.  Wet heat and ibuprofen will also help.  The smaller clotted areas will self absorb over about 2 months but I prefer to drain these as needed.


Naples General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Lumps and Clumps on Hand After Sclerotherapy

I suggest having the clots removed, this can be done in the office very easily with a blade.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 168 reviews

Lumps after hand sclerotherapy

It can take several months for those hard lumps to be broken down and absorbed especially if the veins were large and high pressured.  Often times I bring patients back after a few weeks and evacuate that trapped blood using a needle.  This usually helps the vein break down faster and also gives the patient some symptomatic relief.  You should be seen in follow up by your provider to see if this is an option for you.

Lisa Perez, MD
Atlanta Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Hand sclero

yes this can be normal bumps and discoloration are normal for 3 to 6 months after sclerotherapy. Additionally some discoloration can be permanent after sclerotherapy. Hand fillers such as radiesse are often less cosmetically disruptive than sclerotherapy on the hand

Jordan Knepper, MD
Ann Arbor Vascular Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.