Why is one eye smaller than the other? (Photo)

The right eye seems to be upper and slanted as oppose to the left one.

Doctor Answers 6



There are many things that can cause the uneven or asymmetric appearance you are seeing.  First it is important to determine if the bony structure around the eye or the tissue behind the eye has been changing.  This could cause one eye to look sunken or the other to look prominent.  You have some asymmetry in the soft tissue or the eyelid itself and this can cause one to look asymmetric.

The first step is to seek an opinion from an oculoplastic surgeon as to the cause of the asymmetry and make sure it is not behind the eye.  But yes there are many options depending upon the cause


Thanks for your photo and great question.  We are all asymmetric, but we sometimes are so used to looking at ourselves, we don't even notice it.  Your asymmetry is barely noticeable--you are lovely.  I wouldn't worry about this and keep in mind that you are in good company with all of the rest of us.  Best of luck to you.

Eye Asymmetry

Hello and thank you for your question. For everyone, our features will always be asymmetrical. From the picture provided, your eyes appear fine and you have minimal asymmetry. I shouldn't worry too much about it. I wish you the best of luck! Thank you.

Peter Newen, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Eyes uneven

Asymmetry is a natural state. If you look close enough all of your features will be asymmetrical. This is true for everyone. You have probably seen pictures created by mirror images of each side of the face, they look like two different people. You are a pretty girl and there is minimal asymmetry in your eyes. Find something else to worry about since this, in the eyes of an expert, is not a problem.

Talmage Raine MD FACS


Talmage J. Raine, MD, FACS
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Why is one eye smaller than the other?

It is difficult to tell from the photo. There are various causes of eye size asymmetry including eyelid asymmetry (such as ptosis) and eyeball position asymmetry (such as proptosis). See an oculoplastic specialist for evaluation. The treatment depends on the cause. See following video and link too.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Eyelid and eye asymmetry

Eyelid asymmetry is the rule, not the exception.  Often it is only noticed by the patient after surgery!

However it is quite normal to have variances between the eyes.

The trick when surgery is done is to minimize the differences between the eyes, while still acknowledging the asymmetries that cannot be corrected.

Brent Moelleken, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 134 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.