Alar incision scar 5 months post op (Photo)

One incision healed perfectly, the other did not. I'm 5 mo post op. It's worse with makeup since the makeup can't get in between both of the little scar tissue bumps and it looks like a darker line in between. Sometimes it kind of crusts and there's some dry skin built up around it which draws more attention to the area. Does this have to be excised or what? I was told it's too small of an area to risk injecting steroids and possibly breaking down skin around it, making it look worse. Help!

Doctor Answers 3

Alar scar not healed

Hi Hope,
Thanks for your question and photos. It is hard to tell exactly what you need based on the photo alone. It may need to be shaved, or excised and redone to allow the skin to heal better, but usually that is done at 6 months. I would massage and see if that helps to calm the scar down. Try silicone gel and see if that improves it but ultimately your best answer will come from your rhinoplasty surgeon. Good Luck!   All the best, Carlos Mata MD, MBA, FACS @rhinoplasty @alarscar facebook @breastdoctor twitter @docmata instagram #drcarlosmata Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Alar Incision Concerns

Dear Hope4Nose, I would speak with your surgeon and he/she should be able to determine the best course of action to reduce the visibility of the incision. Best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 199 reviews

Alar incisions

Dear Hope4Nose,
  • It looks pretty minor that you might be able to just shave off that tissue
  • Steroids can flatten the area, you can inject it in low doses and low amounts
  • I would visit your surgeon to see what they have to say 

Best,Dr. Nima

Nima Shemirani, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

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