1 Year Post-Op: Am I Bottoming Out? (photos)

Hello esteemed surgeons, I am 1-year post-op with submuscular silicone implants. I did have a little asymmetry pre-op, where my right breast was smaller and sat a bit lower than my left. For the past few months, I've been having a dragging, dull, persistent pain in my right breast and rib area. I also feel that it has visibly dropped much lower than my left side. Is my right breast implant bottoming out? And if so, do you recommend a course of action be taken immediately? Or is it just cosmetic?

Doctor Answers 11

1 Year Post-Op: Am I Bottoming Out after breast augmentation?

Thank you for your question.  The right side does appear to be lower than the left with less fullness above the nipple areola which can be a sign of bottoming out.  I suggest that you see your plastic surgeon for examination.

Bottoming Out?

Hello,
Your photos are blurry unfortunately but it does appear that you could have a compromised fold. The only way to properly assess your situation is with an in-person exam. I recommend that you call your Plastic Surgeon and share your concern.
All the best

Bottoming Out

Hello,Yes, you are bottoming out, and it is not an emergency.  It is cosmetic in nature. If your surgeon isn't a ABPS certified/ASAPS member surgeon expert in revision breast surgery, you should visit a few for a second opinion.Best of luck!

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Bottoming out

can be documented by measuring the distance from your nipple to your fold... or your scar to you fold and if getting longer, you are bottoming out.  Without knowing what you looked like 2  months post-op, its impossible to say if you're bottoming out but one breast is slightly lower than the other.  Best to see your surgeon for an evaluation and recommendations.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Difficult to tell

This question cannot be answered without a pre-op photo and a progressive series of photos to see how the implant in question on the right has settled. While the implant on the right in the current picture does sit a little lower than the left, you may have had this problem pre-op, which wasn't pointed out to you and know you notice it. Surgery can always be performed to correct aesthetic concerns.

Bottoming out?

Bottoming out is something than can be seen in a progression of photos, not a single photo one year out.  Please see your surgeon and review the photos you have had taken over the past year. Your result looks excellent.  Best wishes. 

Francisco Canales, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Bottoming out

You have bottoming out on the right side. A course of action would be good, but it is a cosmetic problem.

Probably not bottoming out

If you were bottoming out, the crease incision on that side would be riding up. Yours are not at the same level but both are still at the bottom of the implants arguing against bottoming out. Please discuss your result with your surgeon as there is a visible difference here.

Bottoming out

Thank you for the photos and though an examination is needed your right implant is lower then that on the left though the areola is also lower.  The incision on both sides seems to be in the crease which would argue against bottoming out as you would expect it to raise up on the breast relative to the opposite side.  See your surgeon though for an accurate answer if you have concerns.
Dr. Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

1 Year Post-Op: Am I Bottoming Out?

Thanks for your questions and pictures.  It does appear that you right breast implant is sitting lower on your chest than your left breast implant.  A physical exam by your surgeon would be best to determine if the implant is bottoming out.

Naveen Setty, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.