Standard/ Full Tummy Tuck vs Extended?

I have been told that I am a candidate for either a Full TT or an extended TT since there is some loose skin beyond e standard TT incision. I have previously posted photos and received differing feedback on procedure. I do plan to consult with 2 or 3 Board Certified Surgeons in the NY metro area shortly. As far as surgical time and cost what is the approximate differential in cost between these two procedures? I also plan to have flank and lower back lipo with either procedure. Thank you.

Doctor Answers 15

The surgeon that wants you to have a perfect result is the one to choose for your tummy tuck

Costs for a tummy tuck should not change much simply because you need to extend the incision slightly.  It will not change the time for the procedure greatly.  I would not alter the cost for my patients.  At the end of the day I want my patients to be thrilled with the results and to refer their friends.  If that means adding a bit of length to the incision, so be it.  Choose a surgeon that wants to give you the perfect tummy tuck result and who is not primarily focussed on their fee.

Dr Rodger Shortt
Oakville Plastic Surgeon
Director of Cosmetic Surgery Training &
Assistant Clinical Professor,
McMaster University

Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Full Tummy Tuck vs. Extented Abdominoplasty

It is very difficult to make a recommendation without seeing recent photographs of your abominal and back area. These abdominoplasty procedures are often variations on a theme. I encourage you to have a consultation with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who can answer your questions, examine you and make the approriate surgical recommendations. You should select the operation that will give you the best results. Best wishes, Dr. Richard Swift


Whichever procedure will provide you with the most complete result is the proper one. The scars, whether short or long, are hidden by the same panties/bathing suit. Because of the increased operating time there may be an increase in the total cost. You would need to ask your surgeon that.

Robert H. Hunsaker, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Standard vs extended tummy tuck.

The lingo can sometimes be confusing and one surgeon's Idea of extended may be different from another's.

Belt lipectomy means taking skin all the way around the waist 360 degrees. I consider this a push me pull me operation and to some extent I think it can limit how much tissue is removed because you are pulling on the back and front at the same time. If a patient needs a belt lipectomy I generally favor an aggressive tummy tuck followed by a staged back excision. I think I get more laxity out of each by staging.

If not a belt lipectomy then your surgeon's use of the term extended may simply mean how far back he/she goes with the scar. To me thats just a tummy tuck in a patient with a lot  of laxity. In my own practice I find that the more I pull downward the farther back the scar needs to go. Each patient will be different depending on the degree of loose skin.

Meeting with different doctors is a good way to get a consensus and an Idea of their fees. You may find that your other consults consider you a standard tummy tuck candidate.

Flank and lower back lipo will generally add cost but  I couldn't predict what surgeons in your location would charge.

Best wishes. 

The link below is part of an faq series and talks about scar length

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Differing Opinions

Without an in person exam, it is impossible to give you a sound recommendation. As you can see from the differing opinions, you have a lot of options. Schedule your consultations and see which procedures gets the most "votes". Best of luck, Dr. Nazarian

Sheila S. Nazarian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Different costs for a tummy tuck

Doctors will have different approaches to this, but my prices do not differ between a full or extended tummy tuck. Altogether, there is not a great difference in energy or even time put forth between these two procedures. In fact, there is a continuum between these because we just make the incision extend to the appropriate site.

Ira H. Rex lll, MD
Fall River Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Standard/ Full Tummy Tuck vs Extended?

It is impossible to make recommendations without any photos, we have an excellent online consultation process where you can send you photos privately and we can begin your consultation immediately to give you an idea of which procedures might be best for you to achieve the result your looking for. Good Luck!

Jordan P. Farkas, MD
Paramus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Get your consultation

All internet opinions can be wrong, you need to be seen in person --- go for your consultations and let the doctors see you in person and check how much extra skin you have and how lax your abdominal muscles are. Then decide what to do.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Tummy tuck

Usually a full tummy tuck will remove what is needed while trying to keep the incision short. Extended generally means going around the hips, more common in massive weight loss patients. Also, adding some liposuction at the flanks should not add significantly to the procedure.

An exam and consultation with a plastic surgeon is recommended to discuss your options.

Extended Tummytuck

I have not seen your photos, but it sounds like extended Tummytuck may be the way to go, since you are also having liposuction. The extended incision will allow your surgeon to remove more skin and sculpt your waist.  It may cost a bit more because the OR time will be increased, as well as anesthesia time. Good Luck!

Robert M. Tornambe, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.