Implant removal, breast lift, nipple revision. Realistic expectations? Options? (photos)

11 year old Mentor Saline implants. R-400 cc; L-400 overfilled to 425 cc. 3 kids later. Pics are 4 weeks postpartum, stopped breastfeeding. I want my implants removed, a lift, and areola reduction . What are my options, most realistic expectation of outcome, pricing? Willing to travel for the best fit surgeon :) I am hoping for small EVEN sized breasts and small even nipples.

Doctor Answers 6

Breast surgery

Thank you for your question.  Your breasts are still going through changes from the pregnancy and breastfeeding.  It is best if you wait 3 months after the completion of breastfeeding before you consider surgery.  All 3 of the procedures that you are interested in can often be done in the same day.  I would recommend a visit to a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon in your area to discuss your surgical goals.

Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Breast implant removal and lift

 Thank you for your question and posting appropriate pictures. You seem to be a good candidate for a breast lift and areolar reduction. In addition, your implants maybe removed at the same time. You should have a consultation and and once planned for surgery undergo preoperative  breast implants deflation under local anesthesia to decide whether not you would need smaller implants as well as strengthening your inherent breast tissue. 

Kevin Tehrani, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

Breast implant revision surgery

Thanks for your question.  Its usually advisable to wait around 6 months after breast feeding before proceeding with breast surgery.  Based on your photographs though you look like a good candidate for revision surgery including breast implant removal, breast lift and areola reduction.  Your asymmetry can be addressed at the same time.  A number of factors such as   how much breast tissue you have, will determine whether or not small implants will be required to provide fullness.  (xxx)  Arrange a consultation with a fully qualified plastic surgeon to discuss your options and goals.

Breast lift

Since they are saline, you might want to deflate them in advance of your surgery so that a lift can be accomplished as the tissue settle. It can also help appreciate asymmetry of the tissue. Best of luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Have them deflated in clinic now

My advice is since they are saline, have them deflated in clinic. I do this all the time for my patients. You can numb up the skin and insert a needle attached to a suction canister and remove the saline from the implant. This allows your breast to start the process of skin retraction and can better estimate what your shape and size will be once you remove the implants. This lets us know if you might need a breast lift to help your shape and breast appearance. It is really a valuable tool that I use. Allow 6 weeks-3 months after deflation before you have your formal surgery done. Hope this helps!

Implant removal, breast lift, nipple revision.

Thank you for your question and series of photographs.  Because pregnancy and nursing causes significant changes to the quality of your tissues, best to allow a full six months or more to pass before seeking surgery. Based on the size of your implants and their duration of placement you will likely require a breast lift, with the right requiring a larger lift than the left. It may be wise to deflate your implants in anticipation of surgery to better assess the degree of lift required. An areola reduction may be possible but without the implants in place, your nipples will naturally shrink and may not be required.  I do think that you can obtain a nice result but would recommend you see a series of ASPS board certified plastic surgeons for an in-person examination and estimate of costs for your area.   

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.