Three months post-gynaecomastia surgery. What happened? (Photo)

I had gynaecomastia surgery in the first week of October. The surgeon took 4g of gland out of my left breast and 5g out of the right, along with some liposuction. When I first took off my vest, I was delighted: the nipples were small and manly and the chest was flat. However, in the intervening 10 or so weeks my chest has slowly returned almost to its pre-surgery shape, with fatty breasts and pointy/puffy nipples. Could it be swelling, even at this stage? Or has my surgery been unsuccessful?

Doctor Answers 5

What to Expect Post Gynecomastia Surgery

Following #Gynecomastia #surgery, your incisions will go through a maturation #process. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the #healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.

Bruising and #swelling are normal and usually increase slightly after the removal of any tape or foam. The bruising will decrease over 3-4 weeks, but may last as long as 6 weeks. The majority of the swelling will be gone within the first 3-4 weeks. However, it may take 6-9 weeks to disappear completely. 

Also, as you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue. The #compression garment helps reduce the swelling, and the longer it is worn, the more quickly you will #heal. It can also assist in the retraction of the skin. If you have any concerns about #healing, its best to ask questions of your surgeon or their nursing staff.

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews



Thank you for your question.

It is difficult to determine without an assessment, as well as swelling may last several months.

I'd recommend booking a follow-up appointment with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon to discuss your concerns.

Take care.

3 Months Post Gynecomastia

Hello, and thank you for your question and photos. It appears your surgery went well as your immediate result showed. You are still quite early in the postoperative period. Continue follow up appointments with your surgeon. You should continue to see improvements over the next 3-4 months. Time is usually what is needed to see more of your long term result. Hang in there.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 72 reviews


Thank you for the question and photos but an examination is really needed.  So consult your surgeon or other expert in the area

Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

3 Months Post Gynecomastia Surgery, What Happened - Has My Breast Tissue Grown Back?

Having a flat chest the day after surgery would indicate that the breast tissue, both gland and fat, has been successfully removed.  The slow filling up of the nipple areola complex would indicate to me that pre-operatively, there was excess skin as well as fat and gland. 

Now that the tissue has been removed from underneath, this skin will take anywhere from 6 months to 1 year to shrink to its fullest.  Also, at about 6 weeks to 2 months, scar tissue usually appears below the nipple areola complex.  This can best be dealt with by the injection of a corticosteroid.

Obviously, the above paragraph is based on my personal experience without the benefit of an in person physical exam. 

At this point, it would be appropriate for you to have a consultation with your personal plastic surgeon and discuss your concerns.  I truly wouldn't worry.  The gynecomastia tissue, both true and pseudo, which was probably removed appropriately cannot regrow.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.