Is it possible that my microdermabrasion a week after my first Botox injection is the reason my smile is now crooked? (Photo)

I had my first ever Botox and filler injections. Basically all over my face, and frankly I didn't want my smile touched but he said my gums show too much so there were injections around my mouth. I was healing like a champ, no issues I was excited and happy with everything. A week later to the exact day of my injections I came in for a microdermabrasion and the next day my left side of my face felt tight and now my smile is crooked? How is that possible and was it the microdermabrasion!?

Doctor Answers 3

Botox not microdermabrasion

It is very unlikely that the microdermabrasion is responsible for your asymmetry.  It takes about a week for the Botox to start to work, so the Botox is responsible and the timing of the microderm is coincidental.  I would not recommend microderm for the 1st 24 hours after a Botox injection, because theoretically you could move the Botox from it's injection site with deep pressure or massage in that period.  By 1 week, however, the Botox is bound to the muscle receptors and cannot move around.   

I would give the Botox another week.  If your smile is still crooked, go back and your doctor can touch up the other side to match.

Honolulu Dermatologist

Your smile

Thanks for your question. Microdermabrasion treats the top of the skin and would not alter your smile. A week is still too soon to see the final results from Botox. Give it a couple of more days and if it has not corrected, you may return to your injector for more options. Hope this helps

Bruce E. Katz, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
3.8 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Crooked smile

It is not very likely that the microdermabrasion did anything as it is very superficial. More likely is that it takes about a week for Botox to really manifest itself and you should contact your doctor and get some more injection to even up the smile

Melvin Elson, MD
Nashville Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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