I suffer with allergies (oral allergy syndrome, birch oral allergy syndrome) but want to have Botox done. Should I avoid??

Ok, so basically im allergic to all fruits and veg, soya and certain nuts (hazelnut, brazil, almond and peanut - that i know of) I really sensitive to pollens and basically all things natural - lucky me :( I would like to have botox - the one that will be used is azzalure... Im UK (england) based. Should i avoid or is it safe for me? Ive tried googling the ingriedients, buts its all very technical and not easy to understand from a non medical background.

Doctor Answers 10

Botox and allergies.

Thank you for your question. It is possible to have a unit of Botox injected under the skin to assess if any allergy exists. Although, this will be out of ordinary for most injectors as the risk of Botox allergy is extreme rare. 

Best, 


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

Botox allergies are very very rare


Thank you for your question.

I recall listening to a lecture by one of the original researchers who used Botox to treat blepharospasm and who is known to be an authority on Botox and he stated that "true Botox allergies are less than 1 in a million". 

You are more likely to be allergic to the preservatives in the saline solution used to dilute the Botox than the Botox itself.

Best
Dr Karamanoukian

Allergies to Botox

I do not know of any patients that have been allergic to Botox. If you are concerned you can definitely have Botox tested in a small area first and wait to see if you have an allergy. Best, Dr. Green

Allergy to Botox

There have not been any credible reports of true allergy to Botox.  If your doctor uses preservative free saline then that would eliminate possible allergy to the preservative.  With your unusual history of allergies, it might be prudent to try a few units test dose, just to reassure you.

Boris M. Ackerman, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

I suffer of an allergy syndrome, but want Botox. Should I avoid?? = consider a Botox Allergy test #botox #allergy

Botox and Botox analogs are unlikely of producing allergic reactions. However, they could.

Patients with high risk of allergic reactions to even products or things that usually don't cause allergy reaction  (eg. natural products, etc) and would like to treat with botox should consider doing a "botox allergy test" first.

Allergy test of any kind should be done by a doctor in a facility where any type of allergic reaction ( mild to severe) could be managed immediately to maintain the safety of the patient.




John Mesa, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 110 reviews

Potential allergic reaction to Botox

Thank you for expressing your concerns. Allergies to Botox is highly unusual. You should have no problems with its use. Do a test spot with a small dose if you are worried. Good luck.

Allergies to botox

Luckily, there are no reported allergic reactions to Botox itself.  Theoretically, patients could be allergic to the preservative used in saline to mix Botox; however, this is very unlikely.

Kyle Coleman, MD
New Orleans Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Botox and allergies

Hello Rachel,

Based on the allergies you listed use of Botox or equivalent type medication should be safe.  I would recommend talking with your allergist if you have one and seeing their recommendation since you do have so many allergies.  Another option is having a small test area injected on your body to see if you develop any reaction prior to any facial injections.

Best of Luck!

Dr. Rednam

I suffer with allergies (oral allergy syndrome, birch oral allergy syndrome) but want to have Botox done. Should I avoid??

Thank you for your question. I can appreciate your number of allergies and hesitancy in attempting Botox, but there should not be any sensitivity or reaction to its use. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Allergies to botox

Thank you for your question. Based on your description, I do believe you should be fine to have Botox or Dysport without any complications. If you are concerned, and don't mind a two step process, I would just do a small test patch on the arm with one unit to see if your skin reacts unfavorably.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.