Is it safe to have stem cell injections in my cheeks for scar tissue treatment after radiesse injected 3 years ago?

I understand from some medical papers that the presence of calcium (such as that in calcium hydroxapetite) can cause stem cells to grow into bone cells. I understand that the Calcium Hydroxapetite crystals from Radiesse are seen in X-rays many years after injection- is it possible there is still calcium in my skin 3 years later? And could this cause stem cells to develop into bone rather than fat if he were to do stem cell treatment on my face?

Doctor Answers 3

Is it safe to have stem cell injections in my cheeks for scar tissue treatment after radiesse injected 3 years ago?

Hello and thank you for your question!

Sure! It is safe if the procedure was done three years ago because the Radiesse is Hyaluronic acid and will last around 8 months to a year, so three years after u do not have any residual Radiesse in the area. So yes, it is safe to do the treatment.

Please visit a board certified plastic surgeon for further advice and the best, safest results.

Good luck!



Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Safe to have stem cell injections into cheeks?

Thank you for your excellent question.  Though a hotly debated subject with ongoing research aimed at assessing their health benefits, there is currently little data to show that stem cell treatment affords any significant benefit.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Stem cells and Radiesse

The calcium hydroxylapatite in Radiesse is designed to stimulate your collagen to replace it and then disappear so there is none in your skin. I would be much more concerned about where the stem cells are coming from and what your doctor is telling you they will do

Melvin Elson, MD
Nashville Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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