I had Gynecomastia surgery (Liposuction) 9 weeks ago yet my nipples are still puffy. Is it the build up of scar tissue? (photo)

I had gyno for at least a year before my surgery(Steroid free) 6 weeks before my surgery a consultant said I may need 2 op's but my surgeon has only done 1 op,he didn't give me much info about after surgery I had do research myself about deep tissue messaging. I got the surgery done on the NHS because it has affected me mentally and I'm still depressed over it,my chest looks worse than it was before surgery. I have attached photo's all photos are from post op taken 9 weeks after surgery

Doctor Answers 6

Puffy Nipples 9 Weeks After Gyno Surgery with Liposuction

Following #Gynecomastia #surgery, your incisions will go through a maturation #process. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the #healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.

Bruising and #swelling are normal and usually increase slightly after the removal of any tape or foam. The bruising will decrease over 3-4 weeks, but may last as long as 6 weeks. The majority of the swelling will be gone within the first 3-4 weeks. However, it may take 6-9 weeks to disappear completely.

Also, as you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue. The #compression garment helps reduce the swelling, and the longer it is worn, the more quickly you will #heal. It can also assist in the retraction of the skin. If you have any concerns about #healing, its best to ask questions of your surgeon or their nursing staff.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Lipo and gynecomastia

Swelling can last months after gynecomastia surgery.  Was any glandular excision performed or just lipo?  Lipo alone won't remove the glandular tissue.  However, that's not always a problem if your breasts were mainly composed of fat.

Tim Neavin, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Swelling Normal After Surgery for Breasts

What you describe is often normal early post operative findings that resolve with time. Swelling after Breast Reduction takes many months to see the final result. Elastic Garments and massage shortens this process. The larger the reduction the longer it takes as a general rule.

Gynacomastia

The post operative swelling from surgery should have improved by now. I noticed no incisions were done on the breast. Therefore some excess breast tissue may remain as liposuction usually does not take care of all the firm tissue beneath the nipple. Consider revision with subareolar incision.

Gynecomastia Treated by Liposuction Alone

Unfortunately most gynecomastia cases need both liposuction (for removal of fat) and surgical excision of the breast tissue. Breast tissue is too dense to be effectively removed through the cannula. It is very possible the breast tissue has been left behind and removal of fat only may make it even more pronounced.

Miguel Delgado, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

Gynecomastia

Removing all gynecomastia with liposuction alone can be challenging as you can get a significant amount of fat out but sometimes leave behind the true gynecomastic breast tissue especially under the Nipple area. I would revisit your PS and address your concerns and ask if a better result can be achieved with an open procedure thru a periareolar incision. You might seek out a private PS for further consultation if possible.

David Liland, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.