Lifting babies after breast lift. And returning to work.

I am currently on maternity leave and was hoping to get a breast lift done before I go back to work. I have a physical job so I need to be 100% healed when I go back. I also have a 3 month old and a 2 year old. How long will I have to wait to pick up baby after the surgery and how long should I expect before I can return to work? I am a 36DD. Thank you.

Doctor Answers 11

Lifting babies and work after breast augmentation

Thank you for the question.  Doctors usually have patients do light activities up until 3-4 weeks.  Lifting and normal work can be permitted after 4-6 weeks from the operation since it usually takes about 8-12 weeks for the wounds to heal and around 4-6 months for the implants to fully settle.  It would be best to visit your board-certified plastic surgeon and get his approval.Best of luck. Dr. Michael Omidi.

An in-person exam with a board-certified plastic surgeon is the best way to assess your needs and provide true medical advice.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Breast Lift

Are you breast feeding? If so, you need to wait until 3 months after your milk has completely dried up. In terms of lifting, wait at least 4-6 weeks. You can return to work before then but not if involves heavy lifting. Hope this helps -- Dr. Nazarian

Sheila S. Nazarian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Lifting kids after a breast lift

It sounds like you have your hands full with 2 little kids and a physical job, so it is very important that you do give your body adequate time to heel so you do not experience any complications. If you are breast feeding, it is important to note that you should not undergo any breast surgery until at least 3 months after you stop breast feeding. In terms of lifting heavy objects/your children after a breast lift, I tell my patients to wait at least 4 - 6 weeks to resume heavy lifting. However, every surgeon has different requirements and you should clarify with your surgeon what they recommend/allow. You can obviously return to work before 4 - 6 weeks, but you will not be able to do the heavy lifting at work until that point.

Jimmy S. Firouz, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Lifting babies after breast lift. And returning to work

I appreciate your question.
Best to wait until 3 months after stopping breast feeding before thinking about undergoing a breast lift.  I recommend no strenuous activities for 6-8 weeks after surgery.  Based on how healing, I re-evaluate that at time frame at each post op visit.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.
Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery.

best of luck!

Dr Schwartz

Breast lift

Congratulations on your new baby! It is too soon to have elective cosmetic breast surgery as you need to wait at least 3 months before considering a breast lift and if you have a lot of milk production you will need to wait even longer. Lifting and return to work after surgery are generally restrictions that depend on the amount of pain and discomfort you are having and they can also vary depending on the doctor but should be no more than 1-3 weeks.

Mark Deutsch, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Lifting after a breast lift

Thank you for your question. I think you need to first consider the changes your body are going through and if you have been breast feeding. In general, I would not recommend any breast surgery until 3 months after breast feeding as they will continue to change. With regards to lifting, a breast lift alone should have minimal restrictions. I would say nothing over 20 pounds for 2-3 weeks. A breast lift does not alter the muscle like a sub muscular breast augmentation where lifting restrictions are more stringent. Hope this helps

Josh Olson MD

There are some important issues to consider besides return to work, etc.

The most important issue which needs to be considered is breast feeding - it takes some time after breast feeding for the milk to dry up and the breast to go down in size, so it is best to wait some time (2- 3 months) after stopping breast feeding so the proper decisions can be made at the time of surgery and to decrease the risk of complications.

Return to work

Thank you for your question.  As every surgeon does have their own set of post operative instructions, it is always best to first consult with your surgeon.  Typically, however, we advise our patients to refrain from lifting anything over 5-15 lbs for the first two weeks after surgery.  We recommend not performing any chest presses or lifts for the first two months.  We advise patients to avoid any trauma to the breasts, especially for the first 6-8 weeks.

Best regards,
Dr. Lane F. Smith, MD
Plastic Surgeon
Las Vegas, NV

Lane Smith, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

Lifting and strenuous work after a breast lift

When you ultimately decide upon a surgeon who will be performing the surgery be sure to follow their advice regarding lifting and resuming activities. With only a breast lift and no breast implant the recovery is actually quicker and I tell most of my patients they can resume fairly strenuous lifting and work activities by 2 weeks. If the implant is placed deep to the muscle then this would be more like 6 or 8 weeks

Activity restrictions after breast lift

Most plastic surgeons will ask you to not exercise for 6 weeks after surgery to allow a proper start to healing. With regards to lifting your newborn, you will need to be careful to avoid direct trauma to your healing breasts. As has been said, your board-certified plastic surgeon will guide you through your recovery. The other important consideration is waiting until your breasts have recovered long enough from breast feeding before having surgery. I ask my patients to be 3 months from breast feeding with no active milk production. 

I hope this helps.

Dr. Edwards

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.