Should I wait to have a breast augmentation after I have children? Will getting it done before effect my pregnancy?

I am 25 almost 26 years old and I am considering getting my breasts done. I am currently a small D cup. I'm not unhappy with the size I'm unhappy with the shape. I wish they were perky and fuller. Also my left breast is significantly larger then my right. I am planning on having children in the next 3-5 years. Would it be better to wait until after I have children to get the breat augmentation?

Doctor Answers 19

Breast Augmentation Before or After Pregnancy

Many women have breast augmentation done before starting their families.  The breasts will go through changes during pregnancy due to the hormone changes that occur.  Those changes will occur with or without implants.  

I recommend you meet with several board certified plastic surgeons.  They will be able to evaluate your anatomy, listen to your goals and help you decide the best course of action.  Your surgery should be customized to you.  That may mean implants, a lift or both.  Choose the surgeon you feel most comfortable with to perform your procedure.  Best of luck!


Oahu Island Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 97 reviews

Breast surgery before having children

Your concern about shape raises the need for a lift rather than augmentation.  This can be done safely prior to pregnancy if the nipple ducts are respected and the glandular tissues are not structurally changed.  Consider this more a skin reduction procedure to get you "perky" with more fullness to the upper breast contours.  Even if you were to augment the size with an implant, you would still be able to breastfeed, although the volume of milk produce may be lessened due to the pressure under the breast gland.  

Breast augmentation and pregnancy- to wait or not to wait

First important distinction to make (with out seeing any pics of your case) is that it sounds like you need a lift more than you need implants/ augmentation.  If you are happy with your size but not your shape, then you need a lift (which will make them less droopy, more perky and raise the nipple).  Putting in breast implants will increase your breast size, making them fuller and perkier. If you don't want larger volume then you should not get implants.  A "D cup" size is plenty large for most frames.  Having implants placed will obviously make them larger and then becoming pregnant afterwards may make them much larger.  If having DD, DDD, EE or larger breasts for more than 9 months or longer does not appeal to you then don't get implants.   It's hard to predict what a woman's breasts will look like after pregnancy as it really varies from one individual to another.  Some will resume their pre- pregnancy size and shape, some will get smaller and saggier, some will enlarge and stay large. If you are actively planning on having a baby soon or something you would not be opposed to then I would recommend you wait until after your pregnancy to see how much saggier you will be (or if you will be the same), or you may have to redo the lift and/or add implants if you have lost too much volume.  It's best to keep the chances of revision breast surgery to a minimum.  An in- depth consultation and examination with a board certified plastic surgeon experienced in breast augmentation and well- versed in all techniques of mastopexy (breast lift) is critical in helping you make the right decision for yourself.  I will be more than happy to see you for consultation on Maui to discuss your needs.  Best wishes.

Breast Augmentation

For women who haven't had children yet, I also strongly suggest being conservative on the size to allow for changes during pregnancy while minimizing sagging/stretch marks. So A cup to B/C probably ok, D/DD not so much.
It would be best for you to visit an experienced board certified plastic surgeon for an in-depth consultation to review your options.

Waiting not needed before pregnancy

Thank you for your question.  In order to fully evaluate your concerns and effectively answer your questions, you should be examined and discuss your goals with a board certified plastic surgeon.  Asymmetry can sometimes be corrected with an augmentation but a mastopexy (breast lift) is sometimes needed to fully correct some cases.  A breast augmentation does not normally affect having children in the future and many studies have shown that it doesnt affect breast feeding as well.
If the implants are put in through an incision around the areola or a mastopexy is performed with the augmentation, then breast feeding could be affected.  It is important to discuss this with your surgeon at your consultation.  Good luck!

John McFate, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast implants and pregnancy

 For this question, which I'm commonly asked in my office, I can only tell you what I would tell my patients. If you're considering having a child in the immediate future than I recommend that you wait until after the baby and the breasts achieves its final size and shape. If this is not planned at all, and may happen years later, then in my opinion it's fine to go ahead and have a breast augmentation. There is no evidence that this is untoward for the pregnancy or breast-feeding. I hope this is helpful.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Breast augmentation is commonly done in younger women who go on to have children.

If you are anticipating becoming pregnant imminently I would wait until the pregnancy is complete. However if pregnancy is a consideration several years down the road there's no reason not to proceed with this procedure. Many young women have breast augmentation and can successfully breast-feed their children.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Timing of breast lift or augmentation with regard to pregnancy is a very personal decision in my opinion

Your question is one that comes up quite frequently, but it is one that is very difficult for any of us to answer. This is because there is nothing inherently dangerous or risky about breast augmentation or lifting before pregnancy or breastfeeding - you would likely be able to get pregnant, carry your baby to term, and breastfeed after breast augmentation just as you would without it. However, we also have to acknowledge that the breasts may change in unpredictable ways after pregnancy and breastfeeding. Some ladies lose volume or tone in their breasts causing them to sag, and some don't notice any change. We just can't predict which ladies will and which ladies won't, nor can we predict whether you would be unhappy with any changes your breasts do undergo with pregnancy, or you would be OK with them and not feel like you wanted anything else done. It boils down to personal preference and judgments about the aesthetics of your breasts, as well as your tolerance for the risk of potential changes to your breasts making you want to improve them again. You have to weigh those against the benefits that getting breast surgery have for you NOW. It sounds as though you are probably more a candidate for breast lifting with or without breast implants than simple augmentation, and this may make things more complex in the decision process because it is a more involved operation, and it is quite likely that you would not keep the same results after pregnancy.  I'm sure that part of your difficulty with this decision includes that you want to look beautiful and feel good about your body NOW and not wait 3 - 5 years or longer, and I completely understand that, as you will never get these years back. If that is a high enough priority for you, then you may want to go forward with breast lifting and/or augmentation, but if you do, just know that you may well need or want another operation once babies are all done and your breasts have stabilized. These things are reasons why this is such a hard question for us to answer. My best advice is for you to consider these things, talk them over with your husband or partner, and if you both still feel inclined to consider breast surgery now, go on a couple of consults with board certified plastic surgeons who are experienced in breast augmentation, so you can learn about the details involved and get some more insight into how the operation may impact your life going forward.   In addition to being certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery, your surgeon should also voluntarily participate in the Maintenance of Certification program administered by that board. This is the best way to know that your surgeon not only has the best training and experience for the procedure, but that he or she has maintained currency in the certification requirements as opposed to practicing on a "lifetime" certificate which has only been reviewed once at the beginning of his or her career. For more information on this you can visit ABplsurg.org or ABMS.org. Good luck.

Breast Augmentation Before or After Children

If you are certain you will have children in the near future you can save a lot of money by delaying your breast lift OR Breast Augmentation Lift. Pregnancy can significantly change the size and shape of the breast so why pay for a result which MAY be significantly changed by pregnancy?  If you can afford to wait you are advised to do so. 

Peter Aldea MD

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 102 reviews

Breast augmentation and pregnancy

Breast augmentation may result in either lesser milk production or the complete inability to breast feed. Depending on how important pure breast feeding is to you will determine if you want to pursue the procedure. Having said that having done numerous breast augmentations and discussing this issue with women of childbearing age as never resulted in this ever being an issue for any woman, at least in my practice thus far.
If you are not planning children for at least another 3-5 years then it is quite reasonable to consider it prior to then.

Best wishes,
Dr. Ravi Somayazula

Ravi Somayazula, DO
Sugar Land Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.