Can a Labiaplasty Correct an Oversized Labia Majora?

How painful is the procedure and what is the recovery like?

Doctor Answers 15

Labiaplasty for labia majora

Labia majora reduction can be done to reduce the excess tissue.  A physical exam will show whether there is excess skin and fat, or whether it is just fat.  The common approach is to excise the excess fat and skin and hide the scar as close the labia minora as possible.  The procedure can be done with local anesthesia or with sedation/general anesthesia.  The recovery will be several weeks of swelling reduction, but you can return to full activity (including sexual) after six weeks.

 

Hope this helps. 

Treatment for enlarged labia majora

Labia majora reduction works to reduce the size of the enlarged labia. The procedure is quick and patients go home after surgery. Pain medication is usually needed for the first 1-2 weeks following surgery. 

Labia majoraplasty

Yes , a labia majoraplasty can be performed to improve the aesthetics of the majora. The primary reasons women seek a majoraplasty is laxity, or excessive fullness of the majora. Most patients have discomfort for a couple of weeks. Full recovery to normal activities is about 6 weeks. Expect bruising and swelling which will subside with time. This  is a procedure I perform using  local anesthesia and oral sedation, but depending on the extent of the surgery, sometimes it is done under general anesthesia.  

Cheri Ong, MD, FACS
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Labia majora reduced by labiaplasty

It is possible to reduce the size of the labia majora. This should be done carefully to maintain the balance of the labia majora and labia minora.

Labia Majora Reduction

Labiaplasty can be performed to reduce not only excess labia minora, but in some cases excess labia majora as well.  Good luck!

Labiaplasty

In my experience, a labiaplasty generally reduced the size of the labia minor. You can liposuction however the labia majora.

Reduction of the Labia Majora?

It is no problem to reduce the size of either the labia majora or minora. However, I have found that frequently the majora is fine and the real problem is with the minora. Frequently a woman just doesn't like the looks of her labia and is not sure what it is that she doesn't like. Go in for an evaluation by an experienced plastic surgeon. He or she will assist you to your analysis.Good Luck.

William H. Huffaker, MD
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Labiaplasty

The labia majora can be reduced and this is called a labia majora reduction. Labiaplasty usually refers to the labia minora, which are the smaller more loose tissue on the sides of the vagina orifice. A labia majora reduction is less common but can be performed, depending on your anatomy. Please discuss the anatomy and your situation with a board certifed plastic surgeon.

 

LEo Lapuerta MD

Leo Lapuerta, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Correction of Labia Majora

Yes, surgical correction of labia majora is possible.  You need to make sure that you choose a surgeon who has experience in this procedure.  The recovery process is similar to the labia minora surgery.

Labia majora reduction - recovery and pain...

In my experience, patients who undergo labia majora reduction seem to experience a similar post-op course as compared to those who have undergone labia minora labiaplasty. In both cases, provided the surgeon is skilled and careful with his technique, patients have bothersome discomfort for the first 2 - 3 days, followed by daily improvement. The time away from work or school is usually 3 - 5 days.

Labia majora reduction is a good procedure, and patients are usually very pleased afterward. It's advisable, however,  for a skilled plastic surgeon to be selected for this procedure.

Charles Gruenwald, MD (retired)
Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.