Still Very Swollen 3 Weeks After Labiaplasty with Hood Reduction, Normal?

I has Labia Plasty as well hood reductions and my Clitoral hood is still swollen and I feel the same as it was on week 2 how long is it going to take for the hood and labia attached to the clit to stop looking hard and very large as i Noticed in pre op that area is usually very small?

Doctor Answers 6

Swollen Labia 3 weeks post op

Three Weeks is way too soon to expect edema to resolve. Labia often swell quickly and asymmetrically early on for the first 2-3 days and varies widely from patient to patient. It can last several weeks to months and vary from day to day if you overdo it, eat a salty meal. Things you can try for early edema resolution: Low salt diet, arnica, bromelain, Ibuprofen. You should have a good idea of your final appearance by 3 months. I tell my patients, for most you are 85% of the way to your final result in about 3 months the rest takes up to a year.
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Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Swelling after a labiaplasty: more than 3 weeks


Postoperative care will usually consist of sitz baths or soaking the area in warm soapy water starting approximately 2 days after a surgery. The sutures will dissolve over the course of several weeks. Swelling can persist for two or three months. Ice can help reduce swelling.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Labiaplasty swelling

Thank you for your question. Labiaplasty swelling can be very intense, especially if accompanied by bruising or hematoma. The labial tissue can expand quite a bit compared to other areas of the body, and it is not uncommon for one side to swell more than the other. I generally tell my patients that it will be weeks of swelling, with each week getting better than the previous. I ask them to avoid anything that can induce swelling such as strenuous activity or friction on the labia for upto six weeks. I also recommend that they keep the labia fairly lubricated (e.g. vaseline or aquafor) during the initial couple weeks when the swelling is most intense. The end results should be fairly obvious around the six week, and there can be intermittent swelling due to over activity or too much friction for another six weeks.

Swelling after Labiaplasty with Clitoral Hood Reduction?

Thank you for the question.

Always best to follow-up with your plastic surgeon for direct examination of the area. Generally speaking, swelling after this type of surgery may persist for the first 4 to 6 weeks.  This can be especially persistent when clitoral hood reduction is performed as part of the procedure.

Best wishes.

Labiaplasty swelling

It is common for swelling to last several weeks following a labiaplasty.  Avoiding excessive activity may help to speed your recovery.

David Stoker, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Labiaplasty swelling

Because the labia tissue is so robust with blood supply it has an amazing ability to heal relatively quickly but it also swells a lot after surgery or trauma.  Most patients are sore for 4-5 days before things start to get a lot better from there.  Some patients can resume work before this time depending upon their occupation.  No exercise for two weeks, no baths/jacuzzi or swimming for 3 weeks, and no sexual activity for typically 4 weeks.  My patients are given an oral pain medication such as Vicodin but icing the area for the first 48 hours and applying some custom  made take-home topical local anesthetic cream seems to work the best.  I would say that about 70 - 80% of the swelling is gone by a month after surgery but it can take up to three months or so for every last bit of swelling to subside.

Most importantly I first recommend following up with your surgeon to see what s/he thinks.  Best of luck...RAS

Ryan Stanton, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.