Bottoming out after capsular contracture. With the capsule tighten and the implant raise up? (photo)

I had a capsular contracture in my right breast. I had surgery to fix it 2 weeks ago. That breast is now lower than the other. I went to see my surgeon and he says that it will go back up. That the capsule will tighten and it will even out. It looks to me as if it has bottomed out. 

Doctor Answers 12

With the capsule tighten and the implant raise up?

It depends on how the capsule was treated. Usually there is improvement but it is too early to draw that conclusion. Best to follow up with your PS.

Asymmetry after surgery to correct capsular contracture

You are still early after surgery, and much of the asymmetry is probably due to swelling.  It is too early to tell what the final result would be. From the photo it does not appear as though you have bottoming out.

Bottoming out after capsular contracture surgery.

Form your photos, it does not appear that you have bottoming out of the implant.  The right breast looks bigger but since it has only been two weeks since surgery, the difference in size could be from post-operative swelling.  I would wait at least another 6-8 weeks before making any final judgement about the size and shape.

John Zavell, MD, FACS
Toledo Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Bottoming out?

It does not look like the implant is bottoming out, it looks like the right breast is just a bit more droopy than the opposite one.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Bottoming out after capsular contracture.

Depending on how the capsule was released an implant can become too low in the pocket, however we can't really judge based on the photo. Give things time, perhaps six months to see how the breast evens out.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Bottoming out?

Typically "bottoming out" refers to malposition of the implant.  In other words, the implant sinks too low beneath the breast.  I see no evidence of this in your photograph.  One breast may be hanging lower than the other which is a separate issue.  Regardless, at 2 weeks you are far too early to be assessing your result.  I would advise waiting at least 3-6 months before making any judgement on size, contour, or symmetry.  At that time, if one breast remains lower than the other, you and your surgeon can make a decision on how to improve the symmetry (eg. one-sided breast lift, etc.).  Good luck with your recovery!

Breasts

Thank you for your question and pictures. I actually think that the "bottomed out" breast looks better that the left one,  Wait a few months for full healing to see how things balance out. The you can make a decision as to which breast will be the best look.

Ramiro Morales, Jr., MD
Pembroke Pines Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Bottoming out after capsular contracture. With the capsule tighten and the implant raise up?

It is common for the implant to drop after removal of capsular contracture. Hard to say if it will tighten again. Wait 4-6 months to see. If it does not tighten may need to release the higher breast.

Bottomed out?

From the photographs you have provided, it does not look bottomed out to me. Because it's so soon after surgery there still can be some swelling weighing this implant and breast down more than the other. I would wait a few months before you can really judge the success of this procedure. Follow up with your chosen plastic surgeons recommended. Good luck.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Still early

The best advice I can give you now is to wait 3-6 months and then re-evaluate.  I am not sure what procedure was performed so you have to rely on the experience of your surgeon.
Best Wishes,
Nana Mizuguchi, MD

Nana N. Mizuguchi, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.