How does Bellafill work after subscision for acne scars?

I see questions on here regarding fillers after subscision for acne scarring, but I'm wondering how Bellafill specifically works. I've read that the main parts of Bellafill are reabsorbed after several days and it takes weeks to months to see changes in scars with Bellafill. Wouldn't the scars tether back down in the meantime? I'm researching all I can before I do any treatment to make sure I choose the best options. I have severe rolling scars on both cheeks. Thanks

Doctor Answers 8

Miracle for acne scars

I have been working with this injectable and earlier derivations for three years.  I was elated to see the use for cosmetic scarring after being underwhelmed by other medical devices.  The results of combining subcision, which is the physical action of breaking up the tethering vertically underneath the skin resulting in a scar, with placement of natural collagen, which doesn't have the potential of bluish discoloration as does hyaluronic acids, is a home-run combination. 

Now to your question, the tethering cannot recur as you now have collagen in that zone preventing the opposing ends of the now-disrupted collagen-composed scar from touching each other to "seal" back so-to-speak.   That's just for the short-term.  As you may know, you now have the PMMA molecule in that same space reprogramming the generation of new type III collagen which is more youthful.

Thank you and feel free to visit my online gallery. 

Dr. Will


Fort Lauderdale Dermatologic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Bellafill for Acne Scars and Subcision

Bellafill works immediately. You see the results at the same time as the injection. For acne scars, if the scar remains tethered after the injection, subcision may be used to release this tethering. For the next couple of days, you will likely have some swelling but after about a week you should see your results. Over the next 3 months you will absorb the collagen that is in Bellafill but at the same time you are making your own collagen, so there is no discernable loss of volume in that time.

Bellafill for depressed acne scars, as long as they soft, is by far and away the best treatment option that we have. It is much better than laser, peels and other fillers. Patients love it.

I hope that helps.

Best regards.

Brian Windle, MD
Kirkland Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

How Bellafill works

Thank you for your question. Bellafill helps replace lost volume in the skin. It is meant for the correction of nasolabial folds and atrophic acne scars. Bellafill is made with PMMA microspheres which recreated the firm structure of smooth looking skin. Bellafill is placed below the depression using a fine needle. The injectable gel immediately lifts pitted acne scars to the level of the surrounding skin for a smoother appearance. Hope this helps, best of luck!

Dhaval M. Patel 
Double board certified 
Plastic surgeon
Hoffman Estates 
Barrington
Oakbrook
Chicago  

Dhaval M. Patel, MD
Hoffman Estates Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Acne scars

We have several different treatments available for acne scars.  For rolling scars and boxcar scars, submission combined with filler and laser resurfacing can provide great improvement.  Choose an experienced Cosmetic Surgeon or Dermatologist who has a wide variety of treatments to offer in order to be able to get the best results.

Marilyn Pelias, MD
New Orleans General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Bellafill effective treatment for acne scars

Subcision is a technique used during the Bellafill injection. This technique releases the dense fibrous scar tissue beneath the acne scar allowing proper placement of the product. Once the product is injected an immediate, short-term improvement will be noticed. Over the next several weeks, the PMMA’s will help stimulate collagen in the treated area, improving the appearance of the scars.

Louis P. Bucky, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Bellafill is very effective after subscision for acne scars?

Bellafill is a very remarkable product.  It has just been FDA approved for acne scars and that is wonderful.  I have been using it off-label for acne as its precursor Artifill®.  However, because of the scarring, it is very difficult to actually get the filler into the very dense scar of the acne scar itself and this needs to be done. Subscision is very important, but cannot actually loosen the knot of the scar itself, but can allow it to be raised and filled beneath with the Bellafill®.  It is important to inject it with great pressure but carefully controlled so that if it get out to the surrounding area, it is not overfilled.  I have developed an injector for this purpose that will allow me to inject 1/10th of 1
10th of a cc.  This can loosen the scare itself, and additional filler is then placed into the fat necrosis that is the pit of the scar.  Occasionally, we use mechanical dermabrasion, that I find much more effective than laser for this purpose.  We can get remarkable results with this.
Dr. Seare

William J. Seare, MD
Carlsbad Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Bellafill

You are correct that the collagen component of Bellafill is resorbed but not as quickly as you suggest. It takes a couple of months to resorb and then it is replaced by your own collagen which is one of the main reasons that Bellafill works so well for acne scars. In fact it is the only FDA approved filler for acne scars. We have used it with great success in our practice. 

Ravi Dahiya, MD
Washington Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Acne Scarring -- Requires a Combination of Fractional Laser Resurfacing, Fillers Like Bellafill, Subcision and Eclipse Micropen

bellafill works fill the scar and induce collagen long term.  I suggest getting combination treatment for the best results.  Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 168 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.