Textured implants not bonding?

I had 365cc textured implants done in July 2016. My right breast implant has not bonded and moves similar to a smooth implant. What is the treatment suggested for bonding now?

Doctor Answers 4

Textured Implant Not Bonding?

When the surgery is properly performed, and there are no unusual problems such as a seroma, and if implant mobility techniques are avoided (post-op implant massage), then this is an extremely rare problem. If adherence has not occurred there is nothing that can be done, short of surgery, to produce adherence at this point. If there are no other issues then you could leave things as they are. It will not have any adverse effect on the implant. The biggest downside would be that over time the non-adhering implant may slowly move south over time. There are differences in the texturization of the implant surface, and not all implants adhere to the tissues as effectively, so the failure of adherence will be greater for certain implant manufacturers.

Textured implant concern

Hello, you would need to see your surgeon to determine if there is an issue (like a fluid collection) that has prevented the implant from healing the same as the other side.  They would be able to discuss possible treatment options

Textured implants not bonding?

Yes, they don't always work like they are supposed to. The only thing you can do is reoperate with a new implant and a removal of the new capsular tissue. A fairly big and expensive surgery. If things look reasonable now you may want to leave it alone. 

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

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TEXTURED IMPLANTS

The main reasons to use textured implants is to get better tissue integration (bonding), decrease capsular contracture and implant displacement.  It is not uncommon that one breast will heal differently from the other. Wearing a bra 24/7 may help this problem.  After 3-4 months your options would be to leave well enough alone or revision surgery such as closing off the capsule and/or inserting a scaffold material.  I would discuss your options with your surgeon.

Todd B. Koch, MD
Buffalo Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.