What should I ask before correction? Was a small 34B and received 375cc silicone. Planned to get 400cc but it didn't fit (Photo)

Having corrective surgery. I want to have a normal shape but what are possible comp/issues? Don't want to look worse. Will I have to go down in size and he said my nipple may be in a lower position.What's the chances of this? Should I reccomend a lift? I'd like to get as much info and possible ?s to ask before I go back under in 2 wks.I was not diagnosed with tuberous breast but after looking at shapes, mine are similar to tubular. I was self conscious and that's why I even had this done. Thanks

Doctor Answers 4

Double bubble deformity

You have a double bubble deformity most likely due to a tight inframammary crease and a short distance from the inferior border of the areola to the inframammary crease.  Your implants appear to be sub muscular and an additional part of the problem may be an adhesion of the transected inferior portion of the muscle to the implant capsule.  There are several corrections including a site change placing the implant subfascial and the use of a shaped textured anatomic implant.  When I examine a patient with a distance of less than 4 cm from the inferior areola to the inframammary crease I encourage them to consider a shaped implant.  Usually prevents the double bubble problem and bottoming out problem.  


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Double bubble.

From the photos you supplied, it appears that you have a double bubble configuration. In my hands, the best direction would necessitate placing a smaller base width implant as well as returning the bottom bubble back to the chest wall. Whether a secondary piece of support such as strattice is necessary is up to the surgeon.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

What should I ask before correction? Was a small 34B and received 375cc silicone. Planned to get 400cc but it didn't fit

seek in person second opinion for too small implants and double bubble effect correction..............

You have double bubble

Hi,

Thanks for posting your question. I am happy to try and help you. It is important to remember that a board certified plastic surgeon will be your best resource when it comes to an accurate assessment of your situation, and concerns.

Having said that, your pictures do demonstrated that you have had your breast implant settle below the breast fold. So what you are seeing is the new lower breast fold is where the breast implant has settled to and the crease on the breast is actually the old fold or old crease of the breast. This occurs because of a few different factors and in any situation, not every person who gets a double bubble is getting because of the same reasons.

So here goes the most common causes, and remember your double may be because of only one of these or some combination a few of them. Each and every case is different. The repair is possible regardless of the cause(s). The type of repair will be different based upon what or how the double bubble occurred.
  • sharp, well developed tight fold (IMF = inframammary fold)
  • short distance from 6 o'clock position of areola and presurgical IMF
  • tight strong tissues of the IMF inadequately released at surgery
  • too large of a breast implant for the dimensions of the chest and breast
  • too heavy of a breast implant for the tissues of the breast to support
  • lower pole fallout

So the repair of the double bubble consists of rebuilding the fold, it is called IMF reconstruction and there are many methods to do this. It is best to see a plastic surgeon with experience IMF recons to assist you with this. It will require surgery. In the meantime, wear support.

Best wishes,

Dr. Michael J. Brown
Northern Virginia Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.