I know it varies but how soon should I be able to go back to work after breast augumentation?

I'm a full time hairstylist and a part time waitress so both demand a lot of upper body but I need to get back to work asap

Doctor Answers 12

Returning back to work post BA

I typically recommend patients to return back to work whenever they feel completely up to it. Most patients take 3-4 days off of surgery. However, it is recommended normally to wait at least 6 weeks after surgery to resume any physical activity such as running, jogging, lifting, pushing or pulling over 15/20lbs for at least 6 weeks post surgery. I also recommend patients after a BA to not lift their hands directly over their head for approximately 10 days after surgery. 
I would consult with your PS though and see what he recommends for you since each patient and surgery is unique

Return to Work Soon, But Avoid Heavy Lifting

Many of the breast augmentation patients at my practice in Toledo, Ohio, are eager to get back to work. That's understandable, but it's important to resist using your upper body to lift anything heavier than about 5 pounds for at least 2 to 3 weeks. Ideally, you can perform duties that limit the amount of lifting you will have to do as a waitress, or avoid keeping your arms elevated for long stretches at a time at your hairstylist job.I use surgical techniques during breast enhancement surgery that help patients recover rapidly, but I still advise waiting a week before returning to work in most cases. Best of luck as you continue your recovery.

Returning to work after breast augmentation

After taking at least 2 weeks off, I would suggest you ease back into work, starting with light duties for 6 weeks. We advise against any kind of heavy lifting until approx. 6 weeks post surgery. Ensuring you’re in optimal health in the lead up to your surgery can help with recovery times.

I know it varies but how soon should I be able to go back to work after breast augumentation?

If your job entails a lot of arm movement and upper body strength I would recommend two weeks or at least modified duties. Each surgeon has their own post operative recommendations you should address this with your surgeon. 

Regards, 

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

Breast Augmentation - Post Op Return To Work?

Thank you for your question and congratulations on your recent surgery. I suggest waiting four weeks before returning to strenuous physical activity. Please discuss your concerns with your board certified plastic surgeon. Also, make sure you follow all of your plastic surgeons post-operative instructions regarding implant massage and use of a support bra. Hope this helps and good luck with your recovery.

Back to work after breast augmentation.

Much about return to work depends on just what you do, and can depend on how your augmentation has been performed. There are techniques to get people back to work fairly quickly, and most of ours will go back before a week or at one week. Many hairstylists in our practice are back by one. If you have a more physical job like waitressing where more lifting is required It could take you longer to be comfortable at work and might require planning.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

When can I return to my job as hairstylist/waitress?

In general it is best to avoid heavy lifting (anything greater than 10-15lbs) for about 3 weeks. In patients with very active jobs such as waitressing, I usually suggest talking to their boss about being on 'light duties' such as hostess or cashier until they are completely healed. Your privacy is protected legally so whether you are having big toe surgery or breast augmentation it doesn't matter. On a practical level, I would discuss your concerns with the surgeon you choose, as each surgeon is a little bit different. Good luck!

I know it varies but how soon should I be able to go back to work after breast augumentation?

Thank you for your question.  I would recommend allowing at least 2 weeks of recovery before attempting to do your work as a hairstylist and part time waitress. The reason is the amount of upper body work that each job will entail.  Your surgeon can make the best recommendation based o the details of your anticipated procedure so speak to them about the details of returning to work.  

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Back to work

 There's a lot of variables that go into the answer to this question. If the implants are under the muscle, it's a completely different recommendation than if they are on top. I allow my patients to go back to work in 2 to 3 days for any nonphysical job. With the jobs that you describe, my patients would be able to go back in a week. I would tell my patients, if it hurts, stop doing it. If you used to do 10 of something, start with two and build back up. Ask your plastic surgeon what their specific recommendations for you would be. Good luck.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Returning to Work After a Breast Augmentation

As I advise my patients, if your work keeps you sedentary, you may return whenever you feel up to it. If your work is strenuous, wait until your work activity does not cause any superficial pain. Some employers will modify a person’s job duties so they can back sooner, but without physical activity. Our office can provide our patients with a note stating they are not to engage in strenuous activity for a specified period of time. The note will not disclose what procedure they have underwent. Therefore, you may have to request a similar note from your surgeon if you are not independently employeed. I recommend avoiding heavy lifting and strenuous #activity for six weeks following your #BreastSurgery. With that said, it may help you plan your return to work accordingly.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.