I have a hematoma. Had surgery yesterday at 7am

When will the bruises go away and when will it stop hurting I got a 415cc in each breast was previously a double A ice been in bed for two days my right breasts feels fine my left is still hurting and I have not been using it hardly at all other that to go to the bathroom and eat I just paid $500 to repair the hematoma I'd hate for it to happen again when I'm literally not leaving by bed

Doctor Answers 6

After hematoma

Sorry to hear that you had a hematoma after breast augmentation.
Once you have a bruising, it will take several weeks for it to be resolved.
If you have persistent pain, you should visit your plastic surgeon to be examined in-person.
Good luck with your recovery.

Hematoma

Bruising after breast augmentation is not unheard of and certainly could be worse after having a hematoma. In my experience, I have told my patients after breast augmentation to keep their heart rate and blood pressure normal but never to remain motionless in bed. I recommend you follow the recommendations of your chosen plastic surgeon. Best of luck and congratulations on your surgery. 

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Post op healing breast augmentation

Hello

Thank you for your question. You are still in the infancy of your recovery. It is not uncommon to see bruising and swelling of this kind during your stage of recovery.

Best regards

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

Hematoma after breast augmentation

Sorry to hear you had a hematoma.  The bruising and pain may take a few weeks to improve.   Reducing your activity level will help but you don't want to be completely immobile.  Move around every 2 -3 hours to keep your blood circulating.  Hope this helps.

Pain after Hematoma

Hi, Brianna. I am sorry to hear that you experienced this complication, and hopefully you will be feeling better soon. Most important is treating a hematoma early, which it sounds like you did. 

Every surgeon has his/her own protocol for managing further complications following development of a hematoma and to prevent a recurrance of the hematoma. I find that there is a delicate line between too much activity and/or movement vs. developing stiffness and/or tissue (or implant pocket) contraction. Therefore, very close follow-up,with yoir surgeon is important. 

Heavier bruising is to be expected after a hematoma, and this bruising may take some time to resolve. (It may even show up in new places as the bruising begins to surface.). Most often, one experiences a huge relief following evacuation of a hematoma, and the pain is significantly less. However, the heavy bruising may cause some soreness, as well as the additional inflammation resulting from the hematoma. 

I would definitely encourage you to follow-up with your surgeon to determine whether your pain is normal and expected, or whether something more concerning is going on. I find that liberal use of a heating pad and massage to be very helpful in relieving pain following breast surgery -- however, massaging could increase the risk of re-bleeding (causing another hematoma) or developing excess fluid (seroma), and must be performed under the close supervision of your surgeon.  

Giovanna Ghafoori, MD
Harlingen Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Post Op hematoma

Hello and thank you for reaching out. A post operative hematoma can be very painful, and I'm sorry you have experienced that after your surgery. The bruising can take a few weeks to decrease entirely, depending on the severity of them. Although it is great to hear you are decreasing your activity level, remember to get up every 2 hours and walk around to keep the blood circulating through your legs and body. The pain your are experiencing should subside with in the week. If you feel as if the pain level is out of normal limits, please consult your surgeon with your concerns. Best Wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.