Best procedure for tuberous breasts? (photos)

Do I have tuberous breasts? If so from my pictures, do you think I would need a lift? Or would I get desirable results just from implants themselves? Would I need some type of scoring or arealor correction? Overall what kind of procedure based on my pictures would be best for me and what costs would I be looking at?

Doctor Answers 13

Best procedure for tuberous breasts?

Thank you for the question and pictures.


Yes, I think your breasts do demonstrate some of the qualities seen with tuberous (constricted) breasts; there is a wide range when it comes to tuberous/constricted breast presentation.


Generally speaking, some of the characteristics seen with tuberous breasts include a very narrow base, short distance from areola to inframammary fold, tight (constricted) lower pole of the breasts, relatively wide space between the breasts, "puffy” areola and some degree of ptosis (drooping). 



Generally, correction of tuberous breast anomalies involves breast augmentation with areola reduction / mastopexy procedure. The distance from the inframammary fold is increased (to create a more rounded out appearance). Proper implant positioning improves the distance (cleavage) between the breasts. The areola reduction helps to treat the pointed and "puffy" appearance of the areola.



In the most severe cases of tuberous breast, a more complete breast lift may also be necessary. In many cases however, a lift is not necessary. The patient should be aware that the final result will take months to see and that they will need to be patient and that revisionary surgery is more likely than in patients who do not present with tuberous (constricted) breasts.



In your case, if the appearance/shape/size of the breasts are a concern, you may be an excellent candidate for corrective surgery.

When you are ready, please make sure you consult with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons who have significant (demonstrable) experience with this type of surgery.

I hope this, and the attached link (dedicated to corrective surgery for patients with tuberous/constricted breasts) helps. Best wishes.

Tuberous Breasts

Thanks for your question. I have analysed your photos and I agree with the other surgeons. You have a mild tuberous breast condition. 

The best way forward for you would be to reduce your areolas and lift them to a higher position to improve the shape of your bust and then to insert a breast implant if you wish to have more fullness at the top of your bust.

Tuberous breast correction advices:

Thank you very much for sharing your concerns with us.
After having analyzed all the information and photos provided to us, i can identify that you have a underveloped and mild tubular Breast. 
I recommend you perform a Tubular Breasts Correction with Breast Augmentation using silicon implants, at the same surgical time.

There is a surgical technique for Tuberous Breasts correction, by which it is arranged the tuberous areolar ring from inside, without requiring areolar reduction. In this technique we also need silicon implants, to get a better Breast volume and projection.

Therefore it is very important that the plastic surgeon who will perform the surgery, has the skills and vast experience in this type of procedure.

Respectfully,
Dr. Emmanuel Mallol Cotes.-

Emmanuel Mallol Cotes, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 174 reviews

Tuberous Breast surgery

Hi and thanks for your photos

You do appear to have a variation of a tuberous breast shape. 

Treatment usually consists of breast augmentation, often with implants above the muscle, and release or rearrangement of the tight constricting tissue in the lower part of the breast. Often this is done via an incision around the edge of the areola, but sometimes it can be done through a conventional incision in the crease under the breast. If you wanted the areolas to be smaller, the incision might need to go all the way around the areola and this would be sort of a periareolar "lift" although i dont think you will need very much movement of the areolas, if any. With a carefully positioned implant, you may not need the "lift."

It will be important for you to have a detailed consult with an experienced plastic surgeon who has treated this breast shape before. 

Best wishes-


Tuberous Breasts

Dear Newboobz4me: Although a physical exam is needed to make any formal recommendations, based on your photos alone, it appears you have components of tuberous breasts including a constricted (tight) lower pole and enlarged areolas.  To improve the appearance and size of your breasts, I would likely recommend a breast augmentation that would require an radial release of the internal bands that are causing your constriction (that makes the lower pole of your breast tight).  In addition, you will benefit from a periareolar mastopexy to help reshape your breast.   Please visit with a board certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience with the treatment of tuberous breasts to learn more about your options.  Best wishes,

Dr. Basu
Houston, TX

Breast Implants/Breast augmentation and Tuberous Breast

Thank you for your questions and for your photos.

You do have several of the characteristic features of "tuberous breasts." These include a constricted or "tight" lower breast pole, a high-riding inframammary fold (or breast crease), "herniation" breast tissue into the areola, and hypomastia (small amount of breast volume).

Every patient is different, however, most patients who meet these criteria would benefit from an augmentation with a breast implant, scoring of the lower breast pole, and areolar reduction via a circumareolar mastopexy (breast lift with scar around the areola). I would likely recommend each of these maneuvers to you if I had seen you in consultation.

Breast augmentation is like putting a magnifying glass over your breasts. If you have relatively large nipple-areolar complexes, they will look bigger. This is why I think you would benefit from the scar around the areola.

In order for your breasts to accomodate an implant, your inframammary fold would have to be lowered, creating more distance between the nipple and this fold. This recruits skin onto the lower pole of the breast, giving a more rounded appearance.

Once the inframammary fold is lowered, the original fold will want to create a band across the lower portion of the breast.This is called a "double bubble" deformity. The scoring will release the orginial fold's constrictive band, however, there is always a chance of residual banding that goes across the lower pole of the breast in the setting of tuberous breasts.

It's important that you have an open and honest conversation with your plastic surgeon. I believe you can get a very nice result with these types of surgical techniques.

Good luck.

Joseph Brown, MD
Tampa Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Breast augmentation

Hello and thank you for your question. You do have elements characteristic with tuberous breast and lower pole constriction.  You are a great candidate for a breast augmentation with release of lower pole constriction bands.  The size, profile, and shape of the implant is based on your desired breast size/shape, your chest wall measurements, and soft tissue quality.  This decision should be based on a detailed discussion with equal input from both you and your surgeon.  This entire surgery can be performed with a small incision technique.  Make sure you specifically look at before and after pictures of real patients who have had this surgery performed by your surgeon and evaluate their results.   The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 78 reviews

Candidate for Breast Lift (with or without Implants)

Candidates for Breast Lift with implants (#Mastopexy) surgery are women who have #saggingbreasts due to past pregnancies, genetics, or aging. Often times the sagging is too great to be treated by implants alone. In addition, adding an implant gives both volume and shape to the newly lifted breast.


Women with asymmetric or enlarged nipples or areolae (pigmented areas around nipples)  also may be candidates for a breast lift or a modification of a lift. #Asymmetric breast can be adjusted by adding or removing volume.  One side can be tightened more or less than another.

Different size implants may be used for the two breasts. Different profiles of implants can be used depending upon the shape of the breasts, the type of lift and what the women wants to achieve.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Tuberous breasts

Thank you for the photos and YES from them without an examination your breasts are tuberous and would benefit from a lift with implants.  So go on some consults with experts and find out the risks and benefits of surgery


Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Tuberous Breast

Hello,

You do have characteristics of tuberous breast. Traditional treatment includes entry through a peri-areolar incision, scoring of the tissue, placement of an implant, and a circumareolar mastopexy/areolar reduction. It also includes a greater than 50% revision rate to achieve patient satisfaction.  Knowing this, I prefer to enter through a well planned inframammary incision to place an appropriately sized implant into a dual plane/subpectoral position. By avoiding implant placement through breast tissue and tissue scoring, you reduce the likelihood of common problems like capsular contracture and excessive tissue thinning. After fully healing, usually at least 6 months, a second surgery can be planned to reduce areolar diameter.  When done later, there is less tension around the incisions, allowing better healing and scaring to occur. Best of luck!

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.