How long after stopping breast feeding is it advisable to wait before getting a BA?

I breastfed both of my babies until they were two. I finished feeding my youngest in June (by which stage only feeding twice daily)... How long should I wait before going ahead with BA? They have already reduced to nothing so I'm not sure how waiting will make any difference in terms of size...

Doctor Answers 16

Breast augmentation after breast feeding

Thank you very much for your question. In general, once finished breast feeding, a woman should wait between three and six months before scheduling a breast augmentation procedure. This will give the breasts time to return to their normal size and shape. I recommend that you schedule an in-person consultation with an experienced, board certified plastic surgeon to discuss your unique situation further. He/she will perform a physical examination and review your medical history, then create a breast augmentation treatment plan that is tailored to your induvial needs.  


Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 104 reviews

Breast Augmentation after breast feeding

The engorgement of the breast that occurs during and following pregnancy is related to the hormonal affects on the breast and the body overall. 

Milk production by the breast is ultimate goal of these hormonal changes. This also has an effect on the skin of the breast, which help accomodate the engorgement that occurs. 

This may last for several months following childbirth. For this reason it is adviseable to wait up to a year to have your procedure. Of course each individual responds to pregnancy and its effect on the breast differently. Also, weight gain with pregnancy may influence this decision. Is this your first pregnancy? Are you planning for an additional one and how soon after?  These are all issues to consider which should be thoroughly discussed with your surgeon

Nick Masri, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Breast Augmentation after Breast Feeding

In general, 3 months from the cessation of all breast feeding seems to be a safe interval.  The issue is not the size - it is the milk-filled ducts, engorged veins and swollen tissues - all of which can adversely affect breast implant surgery.

Lyle M. Back, MD
Cherry Hill Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Breast feeding

as recommended below most surgeons recommend waiting 3-6m months at least after finishing feeding due to a higher risk of infection

How long after stopping breast feeding is it advisable to wait before getting a BA?

You will find many very different opinions from plastic surgeons as to when after breast-feeding it is best to have breast augmentation.  It is crucial that the involutional changes be completed before breast augmentation so that you will not find that her breast become smaller after your implants if the breast shrinks more.  I recommend waiting a minimum of 6 months and when people are not pressed or in a hurry, a year.

Breast augmentation after breast feeding

Hi Raisins, I generally recommend at least 6 months, although there is no strict rule. You want to be sure your breasts and general weight is stable for months, or the chosen implants may not suit you as well as they should. Regards, Dr Steve Merten, Sydney, Australia

When To Stop Breastfeeding Before Breast Augmenatation

Excellent question! In my practice, I have my patients wait six months before undertaking any breast surgery. This gives time for any residual milk to dry up. Even at that, there have been a few occasions where I've seen residual breast milk up to a year after the cessation of breastfeeding!  Waiting six months also gives your breast time to get back to a more baseline appearance so that the best treatment plan can be devised for your breasts. If residual breast milk is introduced into the breast pocket, there is a risk of bacterial contamination and increased risk of subsequent capsular contraction. Breast augmentation is not going anywhere. The procedure will still be here in six months. In the meantime, I know it may be frustrating to deal with breasts that you don't feel good about, but think long-term, not short-term. As young as you are, you'll likely need another breast surgery in your lifetime. You don't want to add a revision surgery that could've been avoided had you waited for your breasts to return to a natural, milk-free baseline. Best of luck. 

Millicent Odunze-Geers, MD, MPH
Sacramento Physician
4.6 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Breast Augmentation

Thank you for your question.  In general, it is best to wait at least 3 to 6 months after completion of breast feeding prior to proceeding with breast surgery.  Many women experience deflation of the breast tissue, which may also cause lowering of the nipple position, after breast feeding.  Allowing for sufficient time for the breasts to remain stable in size and nipple position provides an opportunity to determine whether breast augmentation alone or with a breast lift would provide the best result.  It's always important to consult with a board certified plastic surgeon in order to ensure the highest level of care.  Best of luck!

Benjamin Wood, MD, FACS
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

#breastaugment

Hi. It is best to wait 6 months after breast feeding as there can still be residual milk in the ducts. These can harbour bacteria which may result in increasing  infection rates. Make sure you consult with an australian board certified plastic surgeon. 

Regards

Damien

How long after stopping breast feeding is it advisable to wait before getting a BA?

Thank you for the question. I would suggest that you wait at least 3 to 6 months before undergoing elective breast surgery, after you have stopped breast-feeding. Best to have achieved a long-term stable weight also. Doing so will allow your breast to have reached a “steady state”; this will allow you to communicate your goals precisely and will allow your plastic surgeon to plan/execute the breast operation as precisely as possible. Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.